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The news link is : http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2-2196880,00.html

When I read this article, I encountered several question below :

1. IT IS the ultimate conundrum of the poultry world, debated by generations of scientists, academics and philosophers. Which came first: the oval thing with the hard shell, or the dim-witted, toothless bird that clucks as it crosses the road for no obvious reason? Now two of the best brains in the land (and a chicken farmer) claim to have solved the catch 22. The answer, it has been decreed, is the egg. ------What does the "dim-witted" mean and "the catch 22" means what?

2. But the learned discussion poses more questions than it answers. Creationists, for example, will argue that if God created Adam and Eve, he probably had a spare five minutes to knock up a chicken as well. ----I don't know the meaning of the last sentence.

3. Science still has many unanswered questions, such as what existed before space? What do you come to when you pass the restaurant at the end of the universe? -----------I don't know the meaning of the last sentence.

4. If a tree falls in the forest and there is no one there to hear it, does it still make a noise? And exactly which law of physics will allow Michael Ballack enough time away from the Chelsea playing field to soend £130,000 a week?-----Meaning of the "law of physics " and "soend "? How to interpret the last sentence ?

Thank you for the help.
Comments  
1.
dimwit=fool, blockhead
catch-22: http://www.answers.com/topic/catch-22

2. IMO:
http://www.answers.com/topic/knock-up [slang]
In Creationists' opinion, God could have also made a chicken "pregnant" with an egg [so that the chicken would have been first in the world, and not the egg].
Helloa Alanou - I'm not surprised you're having difficulty. This is written in the same style that I like to write it, but it's "breezy" and full of idiom.

"The question is, which came first, the chicken or the egg?" is the subject of the discussion, as you've probably figured out.

Dim-witted means stupid. Nobody ever suggsted that chickens were the smartest animal on this planet.

Catch-22 is from the book by Joseph Heller. Interestingly, this site: http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/catch-22.html uses the chicken-and-the-egg as another way of saying Catch-22. It means a paradox, or a circular situation in which you never escape. In the book, if you wanted to go on a dangerous mission, you were insane, but if you were insane, you weren't fit for duty, but if you said you were insane, it meants you were trying to get out of the dangerous mission, something a sane person would do... in other words, damned if you do, damned if you don't.

Knock up - I would think the writer meant "knock out," which means to produce. Knock up means to impregnate. Although given the subject, perhaps he did mean to impregnate. The whole things means that if God made a man and a woman, He probably could have quite easily made a chicken too.

The Restaurant at the End of the Universe is also form a book, by Douglas Adams. The restaurant was at the end of the universe, but as it happens, it wasn't at the linear end, but at the time-end. But it was caught in a time loop. Diners could eat and watch the universe explode (or was it implode) and the be whisked back to the beginning of their evening so they could travel safely home. It's a very funny book, but you have to like that sort of humor. Also, most people (who haven't read it) think that the restaurant was at the linear end, so this author asks what you see when you pass it - what is beyond the universe?

I don't know who Michael Ballack is, but soend appears to be a typo for spend. Google tells me he's a soccer/football player. Our British friends can tell you more about him, I'm sure, but it would appear that he receives a huge salary for playing football and the writer is asking sarcastically how he can ever find enough time to spend it all.

Hope these answer your questions. We'll wait in eager anticipation for more information on Mr. Ballack.
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In British English knock up can also mean to make something in a quick, slightly haphazard way.

Michael Ballack is a professional footballer who has just been awarded a massive salary- £130,000 per week (over 6.5 million pounds a year) - so everyone here is a bit shocked by it!
Grammar Geek
Helloa Alanou - I'm not surprised you're having difficulty. This is written in the same style that I like to write it, but it's "breezy" and full of idiom.

"The question is, which came first, the chicken or the egg?" is the subject of the discussion, as you've probably figured out.

Dim-witted means stupid. Nobody ever suggsted that chickens were the smartest animal on this planet.

Catch-22 is from the book by Joseph Heller. Interestingly, this site: http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/catch-22.html uses the chicken-and-the-egg as another way of saying Catch-22. It means a paradox, or a circular situation in which you never escape. In the book, if you wanted to go on a dangerous mission, you were insane, but if you were insane, you weren't fit for duty, but if you said you were insane, it meants you were trying to get out of the dangerous mission, something a sane person would do... in other words, damned if you do, damned if you don't.

Knock up - I would think the writer meant "knock out," which means to produce. Knock up means to impregnate. Although given the subject, perhaps he did mean to impregnate. The whole things means that if God made a man and a woman, He probably could have quite easily made a chicken too.

The Restaurant at the End of the Universe is also form a book, by Douglas Adams. The restaurant was at the end of the universe, but as it happens, it wasn't at the linear end, but at the time-end. But it was caught in a time loop. Diners could eat and watch the universe explode (or was it implode) and the be whisked back to the beginning of their evening so they could travel safely home. It's a very funny book, but you have to like that sort of humor. Also, most people (who haven't read it) think that the restaurant was at the linear end, so this author asks what you see when you pass it - what is beyond the universe?

I don't know who Michael Ballack is, but soend appears to be a typo for spend. Google tells me he's a soccer/football player. Our British friends can tell you more about him, I'm sure, but it would appear that he receives a huge salary for playing football and the writer is asking sarcastically how he can ever find enough time to spend it all.

Hope these answer your questions. We'll wait in eager anticipation for more information on Mr. Ballack.

IMO, in the last sentence, Geek used a idioms "in eager anticipation" to express "wishfully", right? What is the exactly meaning of the "in eager anticipation " in context? Can I only use the "in eagerly" or the "in anticipation" or other words to press the same meaning? IMO, the" in eager anticipation" is used to describe the degree of "wait", right?

Another question, in the sentence of "Deciding whether or not to smoke will ultimately be your child's decision. There are things that you can do which will help to make that decision the healthy option", does "whether or not" equal "whether"? Cuz I think the writter only want to express the meaning of "if ", if I use the word "whether" or "if " instead ,does the sentence still keep the same meaning? (Probably you can understand what I mean, but tell me any grammar mistake in blue senstence if exit.)
Hi guys,

I'd just like to add a small aside.

Several question from a news.

This term 'a news' has been used on the Forum several times recently. It's incorrect. You need to say something like 'a newspaper story' or 'a news item'. You could also speak of 'the news', as in 'several questions from the news'.

Best wishes, Clive
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"in eager anticipation" describes our state while we are waiting - you can substitute "we will eagerly await more information."

There are some people who insist that you use "whether" only if you can say "whether A or B" (which can include whether or not) and in in that case, you can certainly drop out the "or nor." Whether to smoke as the same meaning as Whether or not to smoke. These same people will sometimes say that you can only use "if" when you can also have a "then": If you decide to some with us, then we'll certainly have a good time (even though you can leave out the "then").

Others will say that there is cross-over in the if/whether usage. You can do a pure subsituation in this sentence: Deciding if to smoke is not grammatical. Deciding if they will smoke is okay. (As long as you're not one of the people who insist on the usage above.)

Regarding your "blue" sentence, three comments. Punctuation marks go after the last letter, then a space. You have it the other way around. [instead ,does] when it should be [instead, does]. I think you meant to say If I use the word "whether" instead of "if," does .... And finally, please don't say "Cuz" when you mean "because." People here should be practicing standard English and writing things that belong in an IM or an e-mail (like "u" for "you" and "Cuz" for "because") can be confusing to people who are just learning.

Does that help?

(P.S. - Sport stars' salaries are amazing! How sad that if you can kick a ball, you can get millions a year, but if you teach English, you get about one or two days' worth of this fellow's pay as your entire earnings for a year.)

Another question, in the sentence of "Deciding whether or not to smoke will ultimately be your child's decision. There are things that you can do which will help to make that decision the healthy option", does "whether or not" equal "whether"? Cuz I think the writter only want to express the meaning of "if ", if I use the word "whether" or "if " instead ,does the sentence still keep the same meaning? (Probably you can understand what I mean, but tell me any grammar mistake in blue senstence if exit.)
Thank you for your patience. I have to admit that you have a super intellect(I meant ability of comprehension). I almost make me confusion after I wrote a question that I want to asked, almost can't understand what I wrote. Whom can I blame(or 'blame to'?)?

Probably, you know, the english education in China is completely for preparation of exam. You know, the type of exam in China is very limited, so the teachers ask us that practise(or practising?) the exercises again and again. Finally, ours english become a "Dump English"! We can't say, can't write, can't listen. Because it is not the request of the exam. Thus, my ability of english is very sucks except a little bit of reading comprehension. It make me feel that I learn english for exam, not for myself !

Now, most of you can see what I wrote is from teacher, english news paper, internet or many articles from all kinds of forum(Cause there is not environment of english for me, so my english is a complex english). Because I really want to learn it by myself. Just as an interest. Not for job, salary, oversea study or anything else, nothing and noone oblige me to do that, except myself, just interest. So I forced myself to browse english website, to post articles in english at english forum etc. It is very difficult to fit that(or leave out?) this attempt at the first, as far now, things getting better(or 'things is getting a little better?).

IMO, one man should grasp a foreign language in his life, that would be funy. He can see another view of the world by it(you know,there is not freedom of press or saying in China) .I am interested in so much things aroud world, therefore, I need to master the language tool . The chinese and english is the two top big language, I know the first, now second.

So, if anyone of you want to help me to improve my english, you'd better point out the incorrect usage in my words(or 'of my words'?) pls.

PS: Above words takes(or 'take,took'?) me about 2.5 hours, thanks to my dictionary software and friends here. Whatever mistake of grammar or usage or tense you find in my words, pls tell me, thanks a lot.