Hi all. I have read the use of quotation marks in American English. I just want to confirm whether the rules are still valid if one quotation mark is followed by another, for example:

We must track the status as a Configuration Item changes from one state to another, e.g. “development,” “test,” “live,” or “withdrawn.”

Thanks.
I am the wrong person to answer this, because I am of the firm opinion that the period and commas should be placed outside the quotation marks.
Mister Micawber I am of the firm opinion that the period and commas should be placed outside the quotation marks.

I definitely agree.
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Jingtian, The New York Times style book says: periods and commas, in American usage, always go inside the closing quotation marks, regardless of grammatical logic. Another source gives this example: ...two complete thoughts joined by "and," "but," "or," or "nor." (Semicolons and colons, however, do NOT go inside.)
Thanks, everyone.

According to The American Heritage Guide to Contemporary Usage and Style:

With other punctuation Put commas and periods inside closing quotation marks; put colons and semicolons outside. Other punctuation, such as exclamation points and question marks, should be inside the closing quotation marks only if it is part of the matter being quoted.

Chicago Manual of Style also says "Periods and commas precede closing quotation marks, whether double or single."

But I haven't seen any examples of multiple consecutive quotation marks, one followed by another. That's the reason I want to confirm.

The New York Times Manual of Style and Usage seems interesting, I will buy it. Thanks.