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I have doubts about these sentences. Do they sound natural to you, native speakers?:-) (Hopefully, I´m asking this question for the last time...)

1. It is still deemed one of the most significant structures from (OF?) the Victorian era.

2. You can walk through the Royal Mile – the oldest street in Edinburgh.

3. You will be certainly stunned by St Giles Cathedral. (WILL BE CERTAINLY x WILL CERTAINLY BE ??)

4. The centre of the religious reformation movement of the 16th century nowadays houses a museum commemorating this preacher. (POSITION OF NOWADAYS)

5. Many people still want to see the place of gathering of witches in (OF?) 1590.

6. This part of Scotland is the largest seabird colony on the eastern shore of Great Britain. (CAN I SAY IT LIKE THIS? OR SHOULD I USE ANY DIFFERENT VERB THAN „is“?)

7. They wanted to escape from the busy life of (IN?) the city.

8. He founded there a monastery in 1128. (POSITION OF „THERE“ – He founded a monastery there in 1128. ??)

9. I was inspired by my own experience from my stay in Scotland.

10. It was the main reception room, also called Saloon. (PUNCTUATION AND POSITION OF „also“)

Thank you,
Eff
Comments  
Eff 1. It is still deemed one of the most significant structures from (OF?) the Victorian era. (of)
2. You can walk through the Royal Mile – the oldest street in Edinburgh. Depends on local tradition. I should think "along."

3. You will be certainly stunned by St Giles Cathedral. (WILL BE CERTAINLY x WILL CERTAINLY BE ??)

4. The centre of the religious reformation movement of the 16th century nowadays houses a museum commemorating this preacher. (POSITION OF NOWADAYS) This doesn't work for me. Either too much information or not enough. What do you mean by "centre"? Is it a city, a town, a building, a compound? What the heck preacher??
I would expect something like, "The city of Zanadu was the center of the religious reformation movement of the 16th century, and the home of it's founder, the renouned minister, Archibald MacLeish. Nowadays the city houses a museum commemorating this preacher."

5. Many people still want to see the place of gathering of witches in (OF?) 1590. Many people still want to see the / this place where witches gathered in 1590.

6. This part of Scotland is home to the largest seabird colony on the eastern shore of Great Britain. (CAN I SAY IT LIKE THIS? OR SHOULD I USE ANY DIFFERENT VERB THAN „is“?)

7. They wanted to escape from the busy life of (IN?) the city. (of)

8. He founded there a monastery in 1128. (POSITION OF „THERE“ – He founded a monastery there in 1128. ??)

9. I was inspired by my own experiences during from my stay in Scotland.

10. It was the main reception room, also called Saloon. (PUNCTUATION AND POSITION OF „also“) Also is okay, pos. & punct. Are you sure about "also called Saloon"? I should think, article, small "s," "salon." "also called the salon." But I could be completely wrong.
Thanks a lot.

It is "the Saloon", as stated on the castle´s homepage: http://www.culzeanexperience.org/experiences.asp

As for sentence Nr.9 - Does this really mean that when writing the thesis about Scotland, I was inspired by my own stay there? It probably wasn´t evident in my original sentence...
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Hi,

#10. In the US our tradition of "cowboy movies" has us indoctrinated that "the / a saloon" is a generic term for for a bar room with swinging doors in the old west, like The Longbranch in Dodge City.

So yours has a generic description, "the main reception room," and two "proper names," "the Round Drawing Room" and "the Saloon." I would expect the article "the" to be capitalized in this case, but I notice that your home page quite consistently does not do so. So be it.

I'd probably say, It was the main reception room, and it was also called "the Saloon." I expect the other proper name (the Round Drawing Room) appears in the previous sentence, justifying the use of "also."

#9. I was afraid of something like that! It's hard to know what fits without seeing the previous sentence. Do you mean your experiences inspired you to take on the project of writing this thesis, or that while you've been working on the thesis, you have drawn inspiration (or ideas) from your recollections of your time in Scotland?

I'd probably say it that way: "While working on my thesis, I was inspired by recollections from my stay in Scotland."

OR "Much / Some of my thesis was / is inspired by my own experiences in Scotland."

- A.
Thanks again, Avangi.

I know what you mean by "a saloon" from the old West:-) However, this is not the case. And yes, the other proper name (the Round Drawing Room) appears in the previous sentence.

As for Nr. 9, I like what you suggested - "While working on my thesis, I was inspired by recollections from my stay in Scotland."

Thanks a lot!
Hi, hope this isn't too late!

I read this again and realized that the preferred preposition in this context is "of." "I was inspired by recollections of my stay in Scotland."

"on" and "from" are less common "special" uses. "From" is more appropriate for a collection of "recollections" taken from various sources. "Recollections on" would be like "reminiscences on," or "poems on" a certain subject. Google has four million hits for "of" and only a few thousand for "on" and "from." I guess I was trying to preserve your original "from" usage.

Sorry about that! - A.
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No need to apologize; it is not too late:-) I´m still proofreading my thesis again and again because I´m too nervous. So I will correct it immediately. Thank you.