1 2 3
Okay, so this one time? In band camp? (Email Removed) was all, like:
Mark Twain could kick Shakespeare's ass, if the latter lived long enough.

To be a fair fight, they'd each get seconded by their characters. Longhorn would have to make do with Huck and Tom,

Like fun he would...I'd pick Sir Boss myself..
but Will would take ... Lear and Richard III?

No, not those two...Lear's old and not all there, and Gloucester is er "differently-abled"...Romeo was pretty handy with a sword, as I remember it, and either Petruchio or Prince Hal could probably win the fight on bluster alone..r
Did they pronounce words back in Elizabethan England very differently than they do now? Nowadays, Shakespeare's stuff just doesn't sound ... and poet of all times and languages? Huh? Mark Twain could kick Shakespeare's ass, if the latter lived long enough.

Shakespeare is a lot more fun on the stage than on the page. And a good production can help you to understand the old-fashioned language. Are there any good theaters near you? Failing that, try some of the movie renditions. Titus is a good one (warning: it's extremely violent). I also enjoyed the 1995 version of Richard III and the
1989 Henry V .

-skipka
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Don't you think it's a bit symtomatic that the earliest English author of any significance also happens, by pure accident, no else, to be the greatest author and poet of all times and languages? Huh?

No, Chaucer is older. It's not just about age, Shakespeare really is the greatest.
I read that Coleridge revived interest in Shakespeare as an antidote to the Napoleonic Neo-Classicism sweeping the Continent.
Did they pronounce words back in Elizabethan England very differently than they do now? Nowadays, Shakespeare's stuff just doesn't sound ... still understandable, but very annoying. Couldn't they translate it into modern English? There is no rhythm to be broken anyhow.

That's not the point of the course. The point is to teach you enough English that understanding it should be first nature to you.

If you really want to have fun, read "The Canterbury Tales" in the original English. Shakespeare looks very easy after that. Actually, I enjoy reading Chaucer more than Shakespeare, but that may be that I just don't like reading plays.

Stefano
"Diable, Jac`jo, mi estas kirurgisto, ne masonisto!"
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Thus spake (Email Removed):
I read that Coleridge revived interest in Shakespeare as an antidote to the Napoleonic Neo-Classicism sweeping the Continent.

Read it where?

Simon R. Hughes
Don't you think it's a bit symtomatic that the earliest ... greatest author and poet of all times and languages? Huh?

1. Symptomatic of what? 2. You have been misinformed that Shakespeare is "the earliest English author of any significance." We have good prose 200 years before Shakespeare and good poetry 400 years earlier.

I would have put it at several hundred years earlier both both: certainly for poetry.
Richard R. Hershberger
I read that Coleridge revived interest in Shakespeare as an antidote to the Napoleonic Neo-Classicism sweeping the Continent.

Read it where?

"Introducing Romanticism" by Dunan Heath and Judy Boreham. My reading is that as Napoleon was crowining himself Emperor of Europe in the classic Alexandrian tradition, the dissidents scrambled to locate untainted cultural tradition. The English latched onto Shakespeare, the Germans looked to folk music and poetry to express essential "Germanness" (this blew up on the world stage 100 years later). Goethe swung both ways.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Did they pronounce words back in Elizabethan England very differently ... modern English? There is no rhythm to be broken anyhow.

That's not the point of the course. The point is to teach you enough English that understanding it should be ... that. Actually, I enjoy reading Chaucer more than Shakespeare, but that may be that I just don't like reading plays.

I'm with you on that last point. Who was the writer who wrote plays that not meant to be performed? - De Musset?

Rob Bannister
Show more