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That's not the point of the course. The point is ... that may be that I just don't like reading plays.

I'm with you on that last point. Who was the writer who wrote plays that not meant to be performed? - De Musset?

Thomas Hardy wrote one that couldn't be performed in his day - The Dynasts. Hence exam questions like 'The Dynasts - the first play for Radio?' Of course, with CGI, it would make a bazzing movie. Surprised no-one has optioned it - it must be out of copyright.

John Dean
Oxford
De-frag to reply
Okay, so this one time? In band camp? "John was all, like:
I'm with you on that last point. Who was the writer who wrote plays that not meant to be performed? - De Musset?

Thomas Hardy wrote one that couldn't be performed in his day - The Dynasts. Hence exam questions like 'The Dynasts ... with CGI, it would make a bazzing movie. Surprised no-one has optioned it - it must be out of copyright.

While we're lamenting plays (and movies) not produced, I'll put in my vote for "Giraffes on Horseback Salads", written by Salvador Dali and starring the Marx Brothers...an excerpt from the synopsis:
"The 'Surrealist woman' is lying in the middle of a great bed, sixty feet long, with the rest of the guests seated around each side. Along the bed, as decorations, are a group of dwarfs caught by Harpo. Each is supported on a crystal base, decorated with climbing flowers. The dwarfs stay as still as statues, holding lighted candelabras, and change their positions every few minutes.
"While love tears at Jimmy's heart, Groucho tries to crack a nut on the bald head of the dwarf in front of him. The dwarf, far from looking surprised, smiles at Groucho in the most amiable way possible. Suddenly in the middle of dinner, thunder and lightning begin inside the room. A squall of wind blows the things over on the table and brings in a whirl of dry leaves, which stick to everything. As Groucho opens his umbrella, it begins to rain slowly."

After that, of course, it starts to get weird..r
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Okay, so this one time? In band camp? "John was all, like:

Would it be possible to either include the entire quoted name or strip the quotation mark? I'm building up a serious case of unresolvedquotitis.

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >It is error alone which needs the
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >support of government. Truth canPalo Alto, CA 94304 >stand by itself.

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Say, where are those weapons of mass destruction that could have been launched against the West within 45 minutes of the order being given?

Maybe a1a knows. Say, where ...
Okay, so this one time? In band camp? "John was all, like:

Would it be possible to either include the entire quoted name or strip the quotation mark? I'm building up a serious case of unresolvedquotitis.

I think "band camp" is a very nice touch, but shouldn't it be "At band camp?"? And I don't think there should be a comma after "all".

Jerry Friedman
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Okay, so this one time? In band camp? Jerry Friedman was all, like:
I think "band camp" is a very nice touch, but shouldn't it be "At band camp?"? And I don't think there should be a comma after "all".

I consider the "like" parenthetical...it's set off from the following text by the colon (and at least one line break), so it just needed the preceding comma..
As for the other suggested correction, I now have my next research project..r
Say, where are those weapons of mass destruction that could have been launched against the West within 45 minutes of the order being given?

Maybe a1a knows. Say, where ...

Probably having a chat with Saddam. Still, progress is being made. Now that they've found Qusay and Uday, and claim they're making progress on the eaponsway, it should be only a matter of time before they find Addamsay and a1a.

Peter Moylan (Email Removed) http://eepjm.newcastle.edu.au (OS/2 and eCS information and software)
Now that they've found Qusay and Uday, and claim they're making progress on the eaponsway, it should be only a matter of time before they find Addamsay and a1a.

And Gidday.
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Did they pronounce words back in Elizabethan England very differently than they do now?

Somewhat.
Nowadays, Shakespeare's stuff just doesn't sound like poetry.

He could never think of a good rhyme for "Nantucket".
And what's the deal with "art", "thou", etc. ?

So you don't know any language except Recent Modern English, huh?
It's still understandable,

Actually, I rather suspect that it's not understandable to you .
but very annoying. Couldn't they translate it into modern English?

What is the antecedent of "they", pray?
There is no rhythm to be broken anyhow.

Bwah-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha!
I actually think Shakespeare worship is perpetuated much like the myth about Emperor's clothes.

I was going to question the use of the word "myth" here, but upon examination I find that "Keiserens nye klæder" is, indeed, an adaptation of a far older folk-tale, so you get half a point for that. Unfortunately, you clearly have no notion of the history of Shakespeare criticism, which knocks your premise on the head quite effectively.
Don't you think it's a bit symtomatic that the earliest English author of any significance also happens, by pure accident, no else, to be the greatest author and poet of all times and languages? Huh?

"(E)arliest English author of any significance"?
Bwah-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha!
Mark Twain could kick Shakespeare's ass, if the latter lived long enough.

W. S. Gilbert and George Bernard Shaw, both far better qualified than Mark Twain to challenge Shakespeare, tried and failed.

John W. Kennedy
"Give up vows and dogmas, and fixed things, and you may grow like That. ...you may come to think a blow bad, because it hurts, and not because it humiliates. You may come to think murder wrong, because it is violent, and not because it is unjust."
G. K. Chesterton. "The Ball and the Cross"