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You know, it's not my English is bad or something... although I know where to use it.... I would be happy to know jsut the diffrence between Shall and Should.

As I said, I know where to use it.... it sounds logical so I know where to put one of these words.

Thanks alot
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This question has a complicated answer, so I'll give the formal answer first. This is still in wide use, particularly in Britain, and particularly in written literature.

In formal English,and in the first person:
"shall" denotes future tense. It is synonymous with "am going to".
"should" means "ought to", and implies an obligation
"will" denotes future tense, but also implies emphasis, or a determination to succeed.
"would" denotes conditional mood, and is used for hypothetical situations.

In formal English, and in the second and third person:
"shall" denotes future tense, but also implies emphasis, or a determination to succeed.
"should" denotes conditional mood, and is used for hypothetical situations.
"will" denotes future tense. It is synonymous with "am going to".
"would" means "ought to", and implies an obligation

Modern usage, particularly in America, and particularly in spoken English, is a little bit more muddied, hence the confusion. So:

In modern, informal English, especially in America, and regardless of person:
"shall" is rarely used.
"should" means "ought to", and implies an obligation
"will" denotes future tense. It is synonymous with "am going to".
"would" denotes conditional mood, and is used for hypothetical situations.

Basically, it's a mess. In order to get it right you need to know your audience.
Rommie
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To muddle it further, remember that "shall" is present tense and "should" is
past tense. However, these two facts really mean very little these days.
To muddle it further, remember that "shall" is present tense and "should" is
past tense.


I disagree with both of these assertions. They are both either future tense or conditional.
Rommie

Could you please tell me the difference,

1.you should start your work.

2.you shall start your work.

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