Hi,
I am practicing as a student teacher at a secondary school. (My major was not English). Today, I sat in on an English class. The English teacher used
"She is contradictory."
to describe a girl who found it hard to make a decision for contradictory reasons. (The teacher's example was something like that the girl's husband had an affair, she was seriously hurt but she didn't want to divorce) I was wondering whether the English teacher could use "contradictory" to describe a person. Any thoughts?
David
Personally I think it makes sense but is not really what and English person would say. In this scenario I would say "She is contradicting herself, she doesn't know what she wants or she is being contrary" The phrase used here is a bit stiff and formal.
Hi, I am practicing as a student teacher at a secondary school. (My major was not English). Today, I sat ... didn't want to divorce) I was wondering whether the English teacher could use "contradictory" to describe a person. Any thoughts?

One could call a person "contradictory" if it were characteristic of him or her that he or she contradicted.
But I see this as an example of the familiar process of the speaker making the mistake of using a similar-sounding word instead of the one intended. In this case, I surmise the word intended was "conflicted".

I think there's a name for this type of error; how you would find out what it is would be to make a post to alt.usage.english.
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Today, I sat in on an English class. The English teacher used "She is contradictory." to describe a girl who ... didn't want to divorce) I was wondering whether the English teacher could use "contradictory" to describe a person. Any thoughts?

The usual words would be
undecided (if she could not decide this matter)
or
indecisive (if she could not decide any matter.)
Contradictory is not wrong for any grammatical
reason, but is poorly chosen for this context.

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
Hi, I am practicing as a student teacher at a secondary school. (My major was not English). Today, I sat ... didn't want to divorce) I was wondering whether the English teacher could use "contradictory" to describe a person. Any thoughts?

For that example I might have said "contrary" (i.e. perverse).

Mike Barnes
Cheshire, England
Hi, I am practicing as a student teacher at a ... teacher could use "contradictory" to describe a person. Any thoughts?

For that example I might have said "contrary" (i.e. perverse).

Good Lord. Would you really? Hong Kong teachers may not be up to snuff but that's naughty. She has confused , not perverse or contrary, feelings. She is confused, lost, tugged in all directions. I am sure Harlequin has many other words for her.
I hope Kwhatever isn't listening. Don't like his moniker.
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Hi, I am practicing as a student teacher at a secondary school. (My major was not English). Today, I sat ... didn't want to divorce) I was wondering whether the English teacher could use "contradictory" to describe a person. Any thoughts?

I agree with the others that 'contradictory' isn't right. You could say she's ambivalent.

john
For that example I might have said "contrary" (i.e. perverse).

Good Lord. Would you really? Hong Kong teachers may not be up to snuff but that's naughty. She has confused , not perverse or contrary, feelings. She is confused, lost, tugged in all directions.

FWIW, as I said, I was referring to the example provided by the teacher, in preference to the interpretation of it provided by the pupil. The example indicates that a decision has been made - there's no suggestion of confusion or indecision. No doubt the OP is quite capable of ignoring me if I missed the mark.

Mike Barnes
Cheshire, England
Personally I think it makes sense but is not really what and English person would say. In this scenario I ... doesn't know what she wants or she is being contrary" The phrase used here is a bit stiff and formal.

What is it that you think makes sense?

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
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