Hi,

The sentence, "She will have left this place yesterday".

Is this sentence grammatically correct?

If it is so, what would be the meaning that native speakers understand from this sentecne?

That sounds not exactly same with "She must have left ~~~".

Do natives speak that way in their conversations?
"She will have left this place yesterday".

Is this sentence grammatically correct?-- Odd at first reading, but yes

If it is so, what would be the meaning that native speakers understand from this sentecne? That sounds not exactly same with "She must have left ~~~".- Yes, it is a note of self-confidence in the truth of what the speaker has said.

Do natives speak that way in their conversations?- Sort of. I would expect "She'll have left yesterday."
pructusShe will have left this place yesterday.
...

She must have left (this place yesterday.)Following the example of Palmer (The English Verb),

She will have left ... ~ A reasonable conclusion is that she left ...

She must have left ... ~ The only conclusion is that she left ...

CJ
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Thanks Mister Micawber and Calif!!

What I find it really hard to understand is that "will" usually refers to future events, like "I will do it tomorrow", or "I will have finished the job by 5 o'clock", but you native speakers are saying that "will" can also be used to refer to the past events. This really makes non-natives like me so confused.

Why use "will" which usually refers to the future events?

If some natives do not like that kind of sentence style, what or how would they say to express the same meaning?
pructusIf some natives do not like that kind of sentence style, what or how would they say to express the same meaning?
She will have left is approximately like She probably left when it refers to something in the past. She must have left is also possible as a substitute, but it's a little stronger.

pructusWhy use "will" which usually refers to the future events?
You have to make a distinction between will and will have.

X = the present moment

...................................X........................................................

[ 1. This area is the "will" area. >>>

(all time starting now)

[ 2. This area is usually >>>

the "will have" area.

(all time starting now)

<<< 3. But this area is the theoretically possible "will have" area. >>>

(all time)

CJ
Thanks a lot, Calif!!

I see...

But, English seems to be really difficult language for non-natives...
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