She'll introduce a job for me. Or

She'll introduce a job to me.

Can these be used?

Thank you.
1 2
She'll introduce a job for me. Or

She'll introduce a job to me.

Can these be used?

Thank you.
She'll introduce a job to me.<Grammatically correct.

She would find and recommend a job to you.

for is wrong unless she works for you and her job is to introduce jobs to (people).
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I can imagine contexts where these might be used.

By "a job," are you speaking of a position of employment, or a particular task within the duties of your employment?
I"ve merged your two threads. Please do not ask the same question more than once.
Position of employment.
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AvangiI can imagine contexts where these might be used.

By "a job," are you speaking of a position of employment, or a particular task within the duties of your employment?
position of employment.
PreciousJonesShe'll introduce a job for me. Or
She'll introduce a job to me.
Hi, PJ,

I really don't think either one would be a natural thing to say in discussing a new position. Emotion: shake

If you can describe in more detail the scenario you have in mind, perhaps we can find a better way to put it.

- A.
PreciousJonesShe'll introduce a job for me. Or
She'll introduce a job to me.
Can these be used?
Thank you.
Neither of these makes sense to me -- not because of the choice of "to" or "for", but because I have no idea what you mean by "introduce a job." Find a job? Explain the tasks of the job? Create a new job? Please explain what you mean and we'll tell you a more natural way to say it.
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