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I was reading a magazine and found a weird tense usage.
It said, "Jane told Ange she could call her Mom, but Ange said she already has a mother."
Don't you have to say "Jane told Ange she could call her Mom, but Ange said she already had a mother"?

If the first sentence is right as written in the magazine, I think the rules of tense agreement that I've learned were all a big lie!

Thanks!

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Hi Eppun,

Don't you have to say "Jane told Ange she could call her Mom, but Ange said she already had a mother"?

If the fact is still true today, and the moment of speaking is not long ago, you can leave it in present tense. But, if you do it the way you were taught and move it to past tense, that is also correct. So, what you were taught is correct, but there's al little bit of extra choice if the thing was said recently.

Best wishes, Clive
Comments  
Hi, I just wanted to add a little more information.

In the sentence above, Ange's mom is still alive. She's marrying a guy and the guy's mom wants Ange to call her mom, but she doesn't want to and says " I already have a mom."

In this case, should I use "has" or "had"?

Can anyone help me?

By the way, the sentence is from US Weekly magazine, and it's a part of Brad Pitt and Angelina story.
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 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.
Thank you Clive for the much waited reply. You are the BEST!