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Hi

Would you say that these sentences are fully natural and synonymous in meaning?

  1. She sues him for rape attempt.
  2. She takes him to court for rape attempt.
  3. She prosecutes him for rape attempt.

Thanks,

Tom

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Mr. TomWould you say that these sentences are fully natural and synonymous in meaning?
She sues him for rape attempt.

She is suing him for attempted rape.

She sued him for attempted rape.

She takes him to court for rape attempt.

She took him to court for attempted rape.

She is taking him to court for attempted rape.

She prosecutes him for rape attempt.

He was prosecuted for the attempted rape of xyz.

(We don't use 'prosecute' as you have tried to use it. The legal system 'prosecutes' - not the citizens.)

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Mr. TomShe sues him for attempted rape. attempt. She takes him to court for attempted rape. attempt.

Note the correction. The present simple would be the right tense if, for example, you were writing a review/synopsis of a movie or a novel.

Mr. TomShe prosecutes him for attempted rape. attempt.

Note the correction. That's also possible (similar scenario), but it implies that she is someone with the authority to prosecute an individual.