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1) A: Mili told me there was a big fight between some boys at the party.

2) B: I wouldn't know. I didn't attend the party.

Or

2) B: Kelly would know, because she's been to the party.

Questions:

a) Does the verb "know" have the usual meaning: "to have information in your mind"?

b) Can I use "won't/will know" instead of "wouldn't/would know" in sentence 2)? Like this:

2) B: I won't know. I didn't attend the party. Or

2) B: Kelly will know, because she's been to the party.

c) What is the difference between "I wouldn't know" and "I don't know", or "Kelly would know" and "Kelly knows"?

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Rizan Malika) Does the verb "know" have the usual meaning: "to have information in your mind"?

Yes.

Rizan Malikb) Can I use "won't/will know" instead of "wouldn't/would know" in sentence 2)? Like this:

2) B: I won't know. I didn't attend the party. Or

2) B: Kelly will know, because she's been to the party.

No for the first one. Yes for the second.

Rizan Malikc) What is the difference between "I wouldn't know" and "I don't know"

My personal impression is that they have the same meaning, but "I wouldn't know" is somewhat pretentious and dismissive.

More charitably, Longman has

I wouldn’t know: used to say that you do not know the answer to something and that you are not the person who would know

See also

https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/321997/what-is-the-difference-between-i-dont-know-and-i-wouldnt-know

and

https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-difference-between-I-wouldn-t-know-and-I-don-t-know

Rizan Malikc) What is the difference between ... "Kelly would know" and "Kelly knows"?

The first shows less certainty. It almost says something like "Of all the people who might know, Kelly is the most likely to know, so she is probably the best person to ask about it".

The second is a straightforward claim. She knows. Go and ask her, and you'll have your answer.

CJ

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1) A: Mili told me there was a big fight between some boys at the party.

2) B: I wouldn't know. I didn't attend the party. More natural than 'attend' in this context is eg I didn't go / I wasn't there.

Or

2) B: Kelly would know, because she was at the party / she went to the party.

Questions:

a) Does the verb "know" have the usual meaning: "to have information in your mind"? Yes

b) Can I use "won't/will know" instead of "wouldn't/would know" in sentence 2)? Like this:

2) B: I won't know. I didn't attend the party go/ I wasn't there.



2) B: Kelly will know, because she was there.

c) What is the difference between "I wouldn't know" and "I don't know", or "Kelly would know" and "Kelly knows"?

I wouldn't know This is an almost standard way of expressing indifference. It also implies 'and I don't care, so *** off'

"Kelly would know" just a normal response.

"Kelly knows" just a normal response.

Clive

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Comments  
CalifJim
Rizan Malikc) What is the difference between ... "Kelly would know" and "Kelly knows"?

The first shows less certainty. It almost says something like "Of all the people who might know, Kelly is the most likely to know, so she is probably the best person to ask about it".

The second is a straightforward claim. She knows. Go and ask her, and you'll have your answer.

CJ

3) Would you happen to know where the document is?

4) As you all will know, election day is next week.

Can I use "will" in place of "would" in (3) and "would" in place of "will" in (4)?

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Rizan MalikCan I use "will" in place of "would" in (3) and "would" in place of "will" in (4)?

No and no.

CJ

CalifJim
Rizan MalikCan I use "will" in place of "would" in (3) and "would" in place of "will" in (4)?

No and no.

CJ

Can "must" replace "will" in (4)?

4) As you all will (must) know, election day is next week.

Rizan MalikCan "must" replace "will" in (4)?

Yup!

CJ

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