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Hello

An old guy tells a young lady that when he used to go to a Sunday school they went on a trip to Walwyk.

In the owd days we used to go out in wagonettes
and the ride itself was a treat. And one time we went to
Walwyk.We had games and tea in a medder. That was in
the owd Rector’s time, but Mr Harold – him thass Canon Thorby
now–was home, in a lovely blue blazer. Funny how a thing
like that’ll stick in your mind while what happened last
week is. all of a jumble.

Something's unclear to me in that passage.

First, I suppose that a medder means "meadow"?

Also, what does that guy mean by saying: That was in
the owd Rector’s time, but Mr Harold – him thass Canon Thorby
now–was home, in a lovely blue blazer.

--- I understand that he was there when Mr Harold was a rector (however it's hard to say whether "rector" here means a priest or a head of a school? It was written by an Englishman) and that now Mr Canon Thorby is a rector and he says that Harold was at home and had a blue blazer on. Does it make sense? It's confusing.
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Hi,

An old guy tells a young lady that when he used to go to a Sunday school they went on a trip to Walwyk.

In the owd days we used to go out in wagonettes
and the ride itself was a treat. And one time we went to
Walwyk.We had games and tea in a medder. That was in
the owd Rector’s time, but Mr Harold – him thass Canon Thorby
now–was home, in a lovely blue blazer. Funny how a thing
like that’ll stick in your mind while what happened last
week is. all of a jumble.

Something's unclear to me in that passage.

First, I suppose that a medder means "meadow"? Yes

Also, what does that guy mean by saying: That was in
the owd Rector’s time, but Mr Harold – him thass Canon Thorby
now–was home, in a lovely blue blazer.

This is talking about two people.

1. The Rector (usually refers to a type of priest).

2. A young person called Mr. Harold Thurby, who later became a Canon (ie another type of priest). My guess is that Harold is the Rector's son.

--- I understand that he was there when Mr Harold was a rector (however it's hard to say whether "rector" here means a priest or a head of a school? It was written by an Englishman) and that now Mr Canon Thorby is a rector and he says that Harold was at home and had a blue blazer on. Does it make sense? It's confusing.

Clive
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Hi Clive

But don't you think that Canon is someone's first name?

From the beginning of the story the author calls him Canon Thorby so I thought that Canon was his first name and Thorby his second name?
Hi,

No. 'Canon' and 'Rector' are titles used by certain types of clergymen.

Clive
Thank you for your clarifications Clive!
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