Here I have 3 questions and I will be glad if you can help me to understand.

I'm not sure to what refer "high quailty middle run"? What is run?

lower grade four and after shots - Also here I don't know to what reffer lower grade (of what?)

"After shots" is it a slang?


(At 2:05 I add the video if that can help to understand better)

Because the master distiller is unable to smell or taste the alcohol as it runs into the safe, it's at this point his skill really comes into its own. The master distiller judges the alcohol by sight alone. He separates the high-quality middle run of the new spirit from the lower grade four and after shots.

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Although I am not familiar with distiller's jargon, I think I understand. When you distill, there comes a point when liquid starts to flow out of the tubing. At first, it is not ideal for drinking (the "fore" shot - note the spelling - both you and the subtitles got it wrong), but after a while it becomes good (the high-quality middle run), and it stays that way until it starts to peter out at the end (the after shot).

Based on what was given in the video, apparently, in the distilling, what is desired is the "high-quality middle run" only, which is what is bottled as "Scotch." Leading up to this "middle run," you apparently have the "grade four run," which is not bottled, and after the "middle run," you have so-called "after shots," which are not bottled either. The master distiller, going by his sight only, ignores the "grade four run," and the "after shots," and siphons off the desirable "middle run" only.

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anonymous

Based on what was given in the video, apparently, in the distilling, what is desired is the "high-quality middle run" only, which is what is bottled as "Scotch." Leading up to this "middle run," you apparently have the "grade four run," which is not bottled, and after the "middle run," you have so-called "after shots," which are not bottled either. The master distiller, going by his sight only, ignores the "grade four run," and the "after shots," and siphons off the desirable "middle run" only.

Can you please explain what is "run"? this is the only thing I don't understand thanks

It's in the dictionary:

"10.a. A movement or flow: a run of sap. b. The duration or amount of such a flow." (AHD)

https://www.ahdictionary.com/word/search.html?q=run

anonymousCan you please explain what is "run"?

Middle run refers to the most desirable fraction of the mixture from the still.

Foreshots / Heads / Middle Run (Hearts) / Tails

These are terms of art of distilling for various stages of the distillate as it comes off the still. They apply mainly to distillate made in pot stills.

The foreshots, as you might guess, are the first parts of the distillate. They're high in such poisonous stuff as methanol and acetone, plus esters and aldehydes. These are discarded.

Heads are the next parts of the distillate, and can be kept or discarded, depending on the distiller. They're high in ethanol, but also in the congeners that give a spirit flavor, aroma, and character.

The middle run, or hearts, consist of all the distillate you keep and (sometimes) age before bottling. The balance of alcohol and congeners is pretty much in keeping with how booze should taste.

Tails are the last bits out of the still. They're low in ethanol and high in congeners, and although they're not harmful, they don't taste like anything you'd want to drink.

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AlpheccaStars
anonymousCan you please explain what is "run"?

Middle run refers to the most desirable fraction of the mixture from the still.

Foreshots / Heads / Middle Run (Hearts) / Tails

These are terms of art of distilling for various stages of the distillate as it comes off the still. They apply mainly to distillate made in pot stills.

The foreshots, as you might guess, are the first parts of the distillate. They're high in such poisonous stuff as methanol and acetone, plus esters and aldehydes. These are discarded.

Heads are the next parts of the distillate, and can be kept or discarded, depending on the distiller. They're high in ethanol, but also in the congeners that give a spirit flavor, aroma, and character.

The middle run, or hearts, consist of all the distillate you keep and (sometimes) age before bottling. The balance of alcohol and congeners is pretty much in keeping with how booze should taste.

Tails are the last bits out of the still. They're low in ethanol and high in congeners, and although they're not harmful, they don't taste like anything you'd want to drink.

Amazing explantion, thanks a lot.

"Run" is how you describe production in a manufacturing process. The series of events from the start of the Scotch-making process to the end, where everything stops, is a "run." The series of events from the start of the Scotch-making process to the end of the "grade four run" is another "run." The series from the end of the grade four run to the start of the "after shots," that is, the high-quality middle run, is another "run." The series from the end of the high-quality middle run to the end of the after shots is another "run."