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Let's say, I'm riding on a bus, all of a sudden I hear a gunshot and the passenger next to me is bleeding. Which is the right tense to use?

1. Someone is shot!

2. Someone has been shot!

3. Someone was shot!

I think #1 is wrong because the shooting has happened and it belongs to the past.

Thanks in advance!
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Comments  (Page 2) 
New2grammarThanks, Yoong Liat! This is interesting. Does it mean if a guy walks up to me and sees the passenger next to me covered in blood and asks "What happened?", I should say "He was shot" instead of "He has been shot"?

Hi New2grammar,

This is my analogy.

The fact that the gunshot has been fired and the bullet entered his body, the event should be described in present perfect based on the scenario given and therefore “has been shot” is the proper tense.
Thanks Goodman for your reply. In the other scenario, would you choose

'The boy pushed the girl' or would you say 'The boy has pushed the girl'?

I feel that both scenarios should use the same tense but have a feeling they could be different and would like to know why.
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The difference is 'current relevance'.

Someone has been shot. [There is still something that can be done about it. Call 911. Try to stop the bleeding. Try to catch the shooter.] (This tense tells us something about the current situation.)
The boy pushed the girl. [No one intends to do anything about it. It is just a report of something that happened.] (This tense tells us what happened.)

CJ
Great explanation! Thanks Calif!
New2grammarThanks Goodman for your reply. In the other scenario, would you choose

'The boy pushed the girl' or would you say 'The boy has pushed the girl'?

I feel that both scenarios should use the same tense but have a feeling they could be different and would like to know why.

I know I am a little late to reply. I see CJ already gave you an explanation. I just want ot add a few words. Some actions require present perfect and some requires simple past. In the “push” context, simple past is good enough.

The bank has been struck by burglars sometime between 2 to 5 am in the morning. The fact remains that the burglary happened sometime in the morning which still is a fact.

He pushed her down the stairs. The pushing happened in an instant and the act was executed. The act of pushing does not continue. Therefore, “ he has pushed… ” doesn’t sound right to me.

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I agree with CJ's and Goodman's explanations.
I agree with CJ's and Goodman's explanations.
Goodman
New2grammarThanks, Yoong Liat! This is interesting. Does it mean if a guy walks up to me and sees the passenger next to me covered in blood and asks "What happened?", I should say "He was shot" instead of "He has been shot"?

Hi New2grammar,

This is my analogy.

The fact that the gunshot has been fired and the bullet entered his body, the event should be described in present perfect based on the scenario given and therefore “has been shot” is the proper tense.

The act of firing the gun was executed instantly and done before the bullet entered his body. Thus, "has been fired and the bullet entered ..." does not sound right to me.
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Thanks Goodman and Yoong Liat. Though I don't completely understand, I think I've learned something from your reply and that is some verbs require simple past because the actions do not continue' and I need to read a lot more to recognize them.
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