1 « 8 9  11 12 » 26
Why that example in particular? It would certainly be a ... words, are the only others I can think of offhand.

It was the only word that I could think of that would convey the concept without giving a hint of which I might prefer. Your words are excellent, but by just spelling them, you show a preference.

The forms of the examples indeed reflect my own usage, but are also, as far as I'm aware, the standard Canadian spellings. Of course my comment was irrelevant to the Pondian dichotomy seen solely in terms of US spelling vs that of the UK, but I wanted to point out that if someone were to use my spelling of the chemical element abbreviated Al to predict my spelling e.g. of the element abbreviated S, or of the SI unit of length abbreviated m, he'd make the wrong inference.

Odysseus
Another Law? What is it?

I had to look it up myself: "As an online discussion grows longer, the probability of a comparison involving Nazis or Hitler approaches one."

A couple of honest questions here no agenda at all.

Is non-awareness of Godwin's Law an indication of the increasingly wide user-base for Usenet? The reason I ask is because I'm slightly surprised that anyone who frequents newsgroups hasn't come across Godwin. (That's why I didn't explain it: I wasn't trying to be obstuse, I was trying to avoid being insulting.)
Usenet etiquette is a minefield, but if one makes a passing reference to Godwin in the future, is it appropriate to explain it or to give a link in the sig line?

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 22 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey.news to harvey.van)
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Andrew Gwilliam had it:

I had to look it up myself: "As an online discussion grows longer, the probability of a comparison involving Nazis or Hitler approaches one."

And there is a rider: anybody who resorts to comparing his opponent to the Nazis has, by definition, lost the argument.

That's actually the bit I was thinking of...

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 22 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey.news to harvey.van)
Not evidently at all. He may be selling cheques signed by famous people, or he could be selling a book ... with other than "money and banking" to use your phrase. It isn't very intelligent to jump to conclusions like that.

"If I am writing an article about paper money, to a world-wide readership, including an uncertain number of Brits, Americans and Australians. Which spelling should I use: "cheque" or "check"? "

"No doubt, but the article in question is a self-published thing that I avail to my clients via the web and in hard-copy form."

These quotes do seem to indicate that he's writing about money and not Monopoly games. They also seem to indicate that he's using this information as a means to supplement a business venture.
That's why there is so much prejudice and injustice in the world. He might even have been addressing his writing ... experience, and if so, I expect he has a good reason to be concerned about the topic of his post.

"Why do I care about that? Because I am trying to solicit the business of Americans from a British base. Many Americans are wary of buying a product from overseas. And vice-versa in the case of the Brits."
I doubt if Luke is trying to solicit the business of poorly educated youngsters.
Evidently. But you you would think that, considering the way you prejudge people. It's known as cynicism. See what I said, above. Oh, so you know who Luke's target audience is - as well as what he deals in now then?!

What I know is based on what Luke explicitly posted.
I don't blame him. It was off-topic - and now you've made it clear that it was off-topic coming from someone with a prejudiced outlook.

What you ascribe to prejudice is what I ascribe to actually reading the thread that is being commented on. You've accomplished quite a trick: you've accused me of jumping to conclusions when you've made a list of assertions about a thread that you quite obviously didn't read.

Tony Cooper
Orlando FL
... the way Luke used the word "avail" is often heard (in England, at least)

I've never seen it before, and I'm English. The only constructions I know with the verb "avail" are 1. He may wish to avail himself of (some resource)
2. (Some action) will not avail him, OR (old-fashioned) will little availhim. Luke's "a ... thing that I avail to my clients" is quite unfamiliar to me: I'd have expected "...that I make available to my clients". To be blunt, I think it's not just bad English - it's not idiomatic English at all.
Alan Jones
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
He may have been a perfectionist. As a journalist myself, I often get caught up in dilemmas that may seem like trivialities to some especially during the fifth-or-so rewrite of an article. However there is invariably reason behind my apparent madness.

A "journalist"? Unh-hunh. Sure.

Tony Cooper
Orlando FL
This whole thread has developed a strange and unsettling tenor. ... posts have been by the OP, Luke, and by Kat.

Can you clarify in what way you find it "unsettling"? Unsettling implies fear or anxiety. What makes you feel that way? What exactly unsettles you about what has been said? (If you don't mind sharing.)

RickyC
I was not, of course, lying.

As a matter of interest, did you, persoanlly, take Lukes's comment as an accusation of lying?
RickyC
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Taste didn't come into it. I was making a point. Anyway, folks, I'm off on my travels for the weekend. Have fun! :-)

The real question for me would be: Who is the gestapo of AEU! Anyone want to list the heirarchy for the benefit of newcomers? :-)

RickyC
Show more