1 « 11 12  14 15 » 26
Since no one else can give Ricky the reason, I will: It comes from the rules of rhetorical argument. Kat made a conflagration

In an effort not to fan the flames, I shall refrain from OY!ing this.
between Usenet practices and the practices of the Nazi party. Not only was it irrelevant, and tasteless, as others pointed out, it is also over-reaching in an attempt to be forceful, and it had nothing to do with the points of contention in this thread.

I assume a few Americans observed Senator Byrd of West Virginia invoking Nazi Germany a couple of weeks ago. The actual parallel he drew was apt, but almost no one noticed.

Liebs
It depends what one means by off-topic.

The meaning of "off-topic" is a question of English usage and is on-topic for this group. I consider something on topic (my usage; no hyphen) as long as it poses a legitimate question of English usage, no matter how far it may have drifted from the original topic of the thread in which it originated. Thread drift is inevitable in a group like this. And as others have pointed out, this is an unmoderated group, and there's no way to stop that drift.

Liebs
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Since no one else can give Ricky the reason, I will: It comes from therules of rhetorical argument. Kat made a conflagration

In an effort not to fan the flames, I shall refrain from OY!ing this.

Oh come on Bob, Oy away. I just met my future son-in-law and I am terrified that my impending marriage will destroy my writing career, so my solution was to sit in AEU all day trying to be a somewhat decent regular. What did I do this time?
Joanne
A classic case of a commonly used word that started ... the TA mechanics must be constipated mechanics", I thought. ;-)

How is this use of "regular" incorrect?

Yeah, how?
In the US, at least, the "Regular Army" is a legal entity consisting of all those personnel who have enlisted therein. "Regular Navy" is a parallel usage. I was on active duty as an officer in the US Navy for three years, but I had enlisted in the Navy Reserve, and I never switched to the Regular Navy. So I was never "Regular Navy." That was more than 40 years ago, and I don't think the labels have changed since then. For the sake of completeness: I believe the National Guard in the US, though an armed force obviously available for combat (witness Iraq), is neither Regular nor Reserve.

Perhaps the Territorial Army is the equivalent of the Reserves. If this is the case, and if Regular Army means in Ricky C's usage what it means here in the US, then all he has encountered is the proper use of some proper nouns.
ICNW, of course.

Liebs
opponent rules

In an effort not to fan the flames, I shall refrain from OY!ing this.

Oh come on Bob, Oy away. I just met my future son-in-law and I am terrified that my impending marriage ... was to sit in AEU all day trying to be a somewhat decent regular. What did I do this time?

If you read the entire paragraph in which "conflagration" appears, I think you'll conclude that the word you wanted was something like "concatenation." I assume you know the meaning of the words and your fingers just got ahead of your thinkers.

Liebs
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
The real question for me would be: Who is the gestapo of AEU! Anyone want to list the heirarchy for the benefit of newcomers? :-)

There is no gestapo in aeu or aue. There is an office called "Sargent Up In Arms", but it is by revolving self-appointment. The mark of office is a cudgel studded with nails in the shape of an "OY!".

It's traditional to pick up the cudgel when discipline is needed, use it, and then return it to be picked up by the next holder of office.

There is another office in aue and aeu called the "NotIn". This is also a self-appointed office that rotates among the regulars. The current holder of the office is recognized by his or her statement of contradiction to a posted comment wherein the NotIn says "Not in my experience..". or "Not in New York" or "Not in Laurel".
Tony Cooper
Orlando FL
opponent rules Oh come on Bob, Oy away. I just ... be a somewhat decent regular. Whatdid I do this time?

If you read the entire paragraph in which "conflagration" appears, I think you'll conclude that the word you wanted was something like "concatenation." I assume you know the meaning of the words and your fingers just got ahead of your thinkers. Liebs

I'll defend or yield on the morrow, unless I am going to be a wily hypocrite and go with my fellow to Palm Sunday mass, which means Roman Catholic atheists do exist, though I like neither group. Is this objectionable topic drift?
Most atheists I've interacted with online are zealous conspiracy theorists, which to me is just as bad as believing in Papal infallibility, or trading a metaphysical higher power for fear of government agency. What is the difference? Fear of God and the FBI amount to the same thing... I'll stop typing now.
Joanne
This meaning has been in use for as long as I can remember (age 68).

I didn't say it hadn't been in use for a long time. I expect a lot of irregularities in American English that are now accepted English in North America, were probably introduced by poorly educated settlers in the New World, inclusing immigrants from non-Engliah-speaking countries trying to get to grips with English.
RickyC
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Sigh, yet another one eager to advertise his ignorance! I've heard "avail" used that way several times.

"Several times"? Kat said "often", and specifically "in England". I repeat that as an Englishman I had never seen or heard it, which is why Luke's use of it was so immediately striking. Ignoramus as you think me, I do read rather widely and take a lively interest in language change and variation. This usage, we are told, is found fewer than 200 times in Internet sources. Matti wrote that he found "197 hits. A quick scan of the top few results showed that these corresponded to Luke's usage. When I restricted the search to UK sites, however, the number fell to just three, and these were much less clear-cut in their form. So it looks to me as if Luke's usage is not at all common in Britain."
It's rare enough, then, to be considered no more than an eccentricity or a plain mistake. If it's a useful eccentricity, it will gradually become part of everyday language. We'll see - but it's not there yet.

Alan Jones
Show more