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Age 68, huh? Does this make you one of the group's venerable bards? ;-)

Hmm. I don't do barding. My brain produces a sort of immune reaction when it meets poetry. I find it almost impossible to read poetry. I get the feeling that my mind is undergoing a takeover bid by something that is bypassing my rationality and causing me to lose control. This results in a physical as well as mental revulsion. I have no clear idea of the origin of this personal quirk.
Venerable? Well, if you insist! However, I'm not into veneration either as venerator or veneratee.
Age? That can happen to anyone.

Peter Duncanson
UK (posting from a.e.u)
Ah, but how does Google determine if a site is a British site, rather than an American one? I suspect that a good proportion of those search results that you conclude are American sites, may well be British sites.

Google.co.uk can be told to search either "the web" or "pages from the UK".

The filtering process used is not perfect (on the face of it). Obviously a webpage with a domain name ending in .uk will appear in the "pages from the UK" results. Some pages that have no apparent connection with the UK are listed in the UK results. OTOH a large number of non-UK pages will be filtered out.
What follows is speculation.
A very important feature of the Google technology is the PageRank. This the number of citations (links from other pages) to a page in question.

If Google keeps some sort of record of the location of citations then it would be possible to include a non-UK URL in a list of UK results if it has an appreciable number of citations from UK sites.
I repeat, this is speculation.

Peter Duncanson
UK (posting from a.e.u)
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
My impression is clearly different than yours.

You have an impression: Matti gave us statistics.
If this usage had been submitted to the group by a foreign learner for comment, my impression is that none of the regulars here would have accepted it.
"Different from", by the way, if you're British, or perhaps "to" if you really must.
Alan Jones
On 20 Mar 2005, RickyC wrote

I didn't say it hadn't been in use for a long time.

Ah, but you did: Your claim: "Regular" as used for a long time by the Americans, and now apparently in ... where that leaves your "now apparently in the process of being adopted by the Brits" judgement of this particular usage.


You're about a century out there, although I have no argument with your point.

Andrew Gwilliam
To email me, replace "bottomless pit" with "silverhelm"
You might find it useful to look at Google's list ... by adding ".site .uk" (no quotes) to the search string.

Sorry, that should of course be "site: .uk"

Almost; but you shouldn't have a space!

Andrew Gwilliam
To email me, replace "bottomless pit" with "silverhelm"
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There is another office in aue and aeu called the "NotIn". This is also a self-appointed office that rotates among ... a posted comment wherein the NotIn says "Not in my experience..". or "Not in New York" or "Not in Laurel".

Imagine my surprise! I had always thought the function of the Notin was to post even with notin to say.
Apparently, if that does happen, it's not in this newsgroup.

Lieblich
On 20 Mar 2005, RickyC wrote Ah, but you did: ... being adopted by the Brits" judgement of this particular usage.

You're about a century out there, although I have no argument with your point.

Fairy nuff; well caught.
(I assume you realised that I meant "before the political entity was founded which led to the primary divergence between great American and British English".)

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 22 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey.news to harvey.van)
On 20 Mar 2005, Andrew Gwilliam wrote

You're about a century out there, although I have no argument with your point.

Fairy nuff; well caught. (I assume you realised that I meant "before the political entity was founded which led to the primary divergence between great American and British English".)

Not convinced by your analysis, but yes, I realised you were referring to that disagreeable behaviour by some of our colonists.

Andrew Gwilliam
To email me, replace "bottomless pit" with "silverhelm"
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If you read the entire paragraph in which "conflagration" appears, ... words and your fingers just got ahead of your thinkers.

I assumed that "conflation" was the intended word.

Me too, FWIW, although I thought it might have been a bit of wordplay rather than a malapropism. "Concatenation" implies a serial association or connection of things that may be completely different from each other, while "conflation" implies an (erroneous) identification of things having at least a superficial similarity to start with.

Odysseus
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