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The way I used the word is quite commonplace, as you must be aware. Whether that usage is listed in any dictionary or not, I don'tknow. I can't be bothered to look!

OK, I was completely unaware, but no problem. But if you're happy to hand your clients linguistic eccentricities, why come here asking for advice you aren't going to avail yourself of?
(And to Peter: I prefer the traditional reflexive form.)

Mike.
The way I used the word is quite commonplace, as you must be aware.

Unaware. This is first time I have met this use.

Me too.

Peter Duncanson
UK (posting from a.e.u)
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
The way I used the word is quite commonplace, as you must be aware. Whether that usage is listed in any dictionary or not, I don't know. I can't be bothered to look!

Add me to the list of people that have never seen "avail" used this way. Your clients may "avail themselves of" your material, but you do not avail it to them.
You can be bothered to come here and pose your questions about the wording of a product you intend to use to sell your services, but you can't be bothered to use a dictionary?

Tony Cooper
Orlando FL
Tony Cooper schrieb:
Add me to the list of people that have never seen "avail" used this way. Your clients may "avail themselves of" your material, but you do not avail it to them.

JPG makes something available, i.e. by putting it on the web clients clients are able to avail themselves of it. I concur that "avail" is no synonym of "make available".
You can be bothered to come here and pose your questions about the wording of a product you intend to use to sell your services, but you can't be bothered to use a dictionary?

Well, I thought he was a fuzzy thinker when he outlined his plan, because he never considered the possibility that his mixed spelling might make him appear American to Brits and British to Merkins: both are not going to notice the words spelled "their" way, but observe the words spelled "wrong". (And I'm not even going into the notion of encumbering the text with parentheses whenever a word is used that has alternate spellings).
Cheers
Michael

It's silly talking about how many years we will have to spend in the jungles of Vietnam when we could pave the whole country and put parking stripes on it and still be home by Christmas. Ronald Reagan, October 10, 1965
If I am writing an article about paper money, to ... and Australians. Which spelling should I use: "cheque" or "check"?

1) Be consistent.

Agreed.
2) Write out the name of the element "Al" to determine which spelling system to use.

Why that example in particular? It would certainly be a poor diagnostic for standard Canadian spellings; it's one of the few words we spell the same as is done in the US rather than the UK. The nouns "curb", "jail", and "tire", with some of the "draft(-)" words, are the only others I can think of offhand.

Odysseus
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
You know of a restaurant in America that takes checks? Where is this singular establishment?

There's a small, family-run restaurant near us where we eat once or twice a week. Although I haven't tried, I have no doubt that they would take a check from me if I found that I didn't have enough cash to pay for my meal. It reminds me of a small-town restaurant where everyone in the town gathers regularly to catch up on the local gossip, although I live in a community of a quarter-million. No, they don't take credit cards.
Bill
Swap first and last parts of username and ISP for address.
(And to Peter: I prefer the traditional reflexive form.)

I made a species of Freudian Slip.
I am English but have lived in Northern Ireland for many years. Soon after I arrived here I was startled to hear the form "avail of". This appears to be idiomatic in most (all?) registers.
Whenever someone uses the word "avail" it reminds me of this oddity.

Peter Duncanson
UK (posting from a.e.u)
The way I used the word is quite commonplace, as you must be aware. Whether that usage is listed in any dictionary or not, I don't know. I can't be bothered to look!

Luke, I suggest that using words in a way that is normal to the widest possible readership might be more important than the issue of American/British spelling differences.

Peter Duncanson
UK (posting from a.e.u)
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Add me to the list of people that have never seen "avail" used this way.

And yoy thought you knew everything, huh?! lol
Your clients may "avail themselves of" your material, but you ... services, but you can't be bothered to use a dictionary?

I didn;t say I never use a dictionary. However, I don't regard dictionaries a the be-all and end-all defning law-books of language. Languages evolve faster than dictionaried do, if you really haven;t noticed.
Anyway, there seem to be too many ignorant idiots in this group for me, so I'm out of here. Thanks again to the folks who offered genuine intelligent help.
Luke
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