If I am writing an article about paper money, to a world-wide readership, including an uncertain number of Brits, Americans and Australians. Which spelling should I use: "cheque" or "check"?

If I use the American "check", many Brits who are not aware of the American spelling of "cheque" may think I'm ignorant. Others may misunderstand the sentence containing the word. (since "check" has many meanings).
I'm not sure what most Americans would think if they saw the spelling "cheque". The ones who are aware of the British spelling will probably think "Ah, the writer is a Brit". I'm not sure what the rest would think.
So which spelling should I use? It's important that I maintain good credibility as a professional, among both my British and my American readers. On occasion, I have written "cheque (check)" or check (cheque) or even check/cheque, but it seems unweildy.

Any suggestions? Thanks...
Luke (England)
 2 3 4 5 6 7 » 26
If I am writing an article about paper money, to a world-wide readership, including an uncertain number of Brits,

Direct your piece to the decisive Brits. They'll know what to do.
Americans and Australians. Which spelling should I use: "cheque" or "check"? If I use the American "check", many Brits who ... spelling of "cheque" may think I'm ignorant. Others may misunderstand the sentence containing the word. (since "check" has many meanings).

You should spell the word the way you spell the word. If you're American, spell it "check". You'll be amazed how many Brits are clever enough to figure out that an American writer uses American spelling conventions.
Why would you think that there are many Brits that are not aware that we spell the word "check"? They have newspapers there and everything. They really have come a long way.
The Australians might need footnotes, though.
So which spelling should I use? It's important that I maintain good credibility as a professional, among both my British and my American readers. On occasion, I have written "cheque (check)" or check (cheque) or even check/cheque, but it seems unweildy.

Writing both forms is patronizing. Haven't you seen the Brits roll their eyes at Areff's posts?
How are you going to handle the color/colour of money?

Tony Cooper
Orlando FL
Direct your piece to the decisive Brits. They'll know what ... there and everything. They really have come a long way.

We have, indeed. We've even got televisions and electric blankets and things these days! ;-)
The Australians might need footnotes, though.

You crack me up, man! I hope there's none reading this. :-)
Writing both forms is patronizing. Haven't you seen the Brits ... How are you going to handle the color/colour of money?

I usually write "colour". I think it's less likely to be interpreted as an ignorant spelling mistake than "color". That's my fuzzy logic, anyway...
Luke
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I usually write "colour".

You misspelled "color".
I think it's less likely to be interpreted as an ignorant spelling mistake than "color".

I think you may have misspelled "culler" too.
Emotion: wink

Michael DeBusk, Co-Conspirator to Make the World a Better Place Did he update http://home.earthlink.net/~debu4335 / yet?
If I am writing an article about paper money, to a world-wide readership, including an uncertain number of Brits, Americans ... On occasion, I have written "cheque (check)" or check (cheque) or even check/cheque, but it seems unweildy. Any suggestions? Thanks...

If you are British, you should use British English. It's not just a matter of spelling, and if you attempt to write AmE you will almost certainly get some things wrong. US readers will cope, just as you and I do when reading AmE material.
Alan Jones
If I am writing an article about paper money, to a world-wide readership, including an uncertain number of Brits, Americans and Australians. Which spelling should I use: "cheque" or "check"?

No problem: this is an editorial style decision for whoever publishes your article. (Your speculations about readers' responses to spelling may be on
the money: but you can do nothing about them.)

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Oh, that's what they're doing ...

John Dean
Oxford
Direct your piece to the decisive Brits. They'll know what ... figure out that an American writer uses American spelling conventions.

Oh, that's what they're doing ...

And all this time you thought that American keyboards didn't come with a "u" key.

Tony Cooper
Orlando FL
If I am writing an article about paper money, to ... and Australians. Which spelling should I use: "cheque" or "check"?

No problem: this is an editorial style decision for whoever publishes your article. (Your speculations about readers' responses to spelling may be on the money: but you can do nothing about them.)

Don't publishers "translate" books from the US into BrE and vice versa.

Eg, "Harry Potter and the Philosopher's (Sorcerer's) Stone"?

JPG
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Show more