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Please someone tell me whether which of the following phrase is grammatically correct - with or without a dash. Furthermore, I sometimes find it difficult to decide whether I should link two words by using dash or not. Therefore, please someone provide me with some advice and tips in order to decide whether I should add it or not.


early school leavers
early-school-leavers

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dileepaearly-school-leavers

Do you mean that these students leave school before the last class is over? For example, if the school day is from 8:00 am to 3:30 pm, they go home at 3:00 pm?

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Comments  

First of all, it's a hyphen, not a dash. And you would have to provide a sentence using your phrase because context is key in this. Besides, "early school leavers" does not readily yield up its meaning.

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 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.

Thank you very much for the answer. What I meant by "early-school leavers" is that someone who leave the school before complete their courses. When it comes to the context of the sentence, I was writing an essay about causes and feasible solutions of increasing crime rate in society. I just wanted to paraphrase "less educated people" as they often leave schools quite earlier than others.

Thank you very much for the answer. In fact, I thought there is no any difference between hyphen and dash.

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dileepa

Thank you very much for the answer. In fact, I thought there is no any difference between hyphen and dash.

People say dash when they mean hyphen all the time, to the point where it isn't much of a mistake, but in contexts such as this one, it is better to be accurate about such things. There are two real dashes in regular use, the en dash (–), which has special uses, and the em dash (—), which is used all the time. The hyphen is shorter (-).

dileepaIn fact, I thought there is no I didn't think there was any difference between a hyphen and a dash.

We transfer the negation to the main clause with 'think (that)', 'know (that)', and similar constructions at the beginnings of sentences.

And we usually keep the same tense in both clauses (think ... was; knew ... were; etc.).


As for hyphens and dashes, the hyphen is usually on the top row of a keyboard after the zero.

There are two dashes. The shorter one is called the en-dash, and it's used to separate the ends of numeric ranges. There is no space before or after an en-dash. (There were 15–20 people in the room when the earthquake struck.)

The longer one is called the em-dash, and that's the more important one. It's used fairly often. In academic style there is no space before or after an em-dash. In journalistic style there is one space before and one after an em-dash.

When the car was finally delivered—nearly three months after it was ordered—she decided she no longer wanted it.
When the car was finally delivered — nearly three months after it was ordered — she decided she no longer wanted it.

The en-dash is produced with Alt 0150.
The em-dash is produced with Alt 0151.

CJ

Thank you very much for the answer.

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dileepaWhat I meant by "early-school leavers" is that someone who leave the school before complete their courses.

That doesn't work very well. We say that a person has dropped out of school when they leave before they should. We call them dropouts. You can qualify that with the type of school—high-school dropout (there is your hyphen), college dropout, trade-school dropout, etc.

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