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Is it grammatically correct to use "should" in if clauses?

If so, would you please give me some examples?

Thank you.

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Yes, though conditional "should" expresses possibilty rather than its usual deontic meaning of obligation:

If Kim should leave the company, Ed will/would take over.

If you should experience any difficulty, please let me know.

If there should be any opposition, they will/would not proceed with the plan.


(Note that in modern grammar the protasis (the if expression) is treated as a preposition phrase, not a clause.)

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And what about "would"? Is it possible to use it in an if clause?

BTW, in modern grammar, what do you call an "if clause"? Is it a conditional clause?

Thank you very much for your kind help.

teal limeAnd what about "would"? Is it possible to use it in an if clause?

Certainly it is:

If you would cycle to work, we'd save a lot of money.

teal limeBTW, in modern grammar, what do you call an "if clause"? Is it a conditional clause?

The conditional adjunct (the if expression) is not a clause but a preposition phrase. In the above example, the underlined bit is a preposition phrase with "if" as head and the content clause "you would cycle to work" as complement.

Would you please be so kind as to reformulate the question below? Thanks again for your kind help.

>Is it grammatically correct to use "should" in if clauses?

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I would say:

"Is it grammatically correct to use the modal auxiliary "should" in a conditional adjunct?"

Note that you could replace "grammatically correct" with "possible".

Thank you.