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Various dictionary gives examples such as "a change of plan" and "a change of address". So should the noun that follows the phrase "a change of" be in the uncountable form?

For example, should one say "There was a change of the gallery's content from traditional paintings to contemporary paintings" rather than "there was a change of the gallery's contents from traditional paintings to contemporary paintings"?

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lifelong learnerVarious dictionary gives examples such as "a change of plan" and "a change of address". So should the noun that follows the phrase "a change of" be in the uncountable form?

There are many fixed expressions in which 'a change of' is followed by a singular noun.

a change of ____
pace, heart, course, scenery, direction, attitude, venue, strategy

However, there is no rule that says you can't use a plural:

Some airlines fly from Los Angeles to Hilo with a change of planes in Honolulu.
Proper walking gear, a change of clothes, maps and a compass are all essential.
A change of plans will leave you dealing with matters you aren't prepared for.

CJ

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lifelong learnerVarious dictionary gives examples such as "a change of plan" and "a change of address". So should the noun that follows the phrase "a change of" be in the uncountable form?

No. They are singular because you only have one address at a time for our purposes, and one plan that is changed. You do hear it the other way from native speakers with a tin ear.

lifelong learnerFor example, should one say "There was a change of the gallery's content from traditional paintings to contemporary paintings" rather than "there was a change of the gallery's contents from traditional paintings to contemporary paintings"?

Your example is not the same thing. The expression is "change of noun". It would have to be "There was a change of content at the gallery …." "Content" and "contents" are two different things. A gallery's contents are everything inside it, right down to the janitor's broom. Its content is all its art and the import of it all.

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anonymousThey are singular because you only have one address at a time for our purposes, and one plan that is changed

Then why is an article omitted before "address"?

Also, can you then use "a change of" for singular nouns only? What if the replacement involves more than one thing (i.e., a set of things)? For example, do you still have to say "a change of painting from traditional to contemporary ones" instead of "a change of paintings from..."?

lifelong learnerThen why is an article omitted before "address"?

And "plan", too. Good question. I don't know. That's just the way we put it. I do know that they are not uncountable. You can have a change of heart, and uncountable heart is fellow-feeling or courage, which is not what is meant. You can have a change of venue. I can't imagine what uncountable venue might be, but even if there was, you would not mean that you had a change of the abstract concept of venue. The venue in question was changed from the one venue to some other.

For that matter, what could uncountable address or plan be? Not every noun has both forms. But that is just me trying to explain it. It is patently a singular noun in the expression.

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lifelong learnerAlso, can you then use "a change of" for singular nouns only?

Now that you mention it, I guess so. Mind you, we are talking about a fixed expression, not about every possible occurrence of "change of".

lifelong learnerdo you still have to say "a change of painting from traditional to contemporary ones" instead of "a change of paintings from..."?

The expression does not work there because the thing is plural. You are not changing one painting the way you change one address or one plan. But this is tricky because "painting" is a ready-made uncountable. You would have to say something like "a change of direction from past to future, hanging more and more contemporary paintings and fewer traditional ones."

I hope I'm helping, but I get the feeling I'm failing to get to the bottom of this.

If the noun that follows is plural, then can you say "changes of (some plural noun) from .... to ....."?

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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If the kind of change is specified by the phrase "from A to B", then does the article before "change" become "the"? e.g., "the consequences of a/the change of communication tools from landline to mobile telephones?"

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