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Hi

Would you please tell me if the following sentence is correct?

Should there be any problem, please let me know.

I have read that "should" in such constructions is equivalent of "if". If it is then the sentence would read: If there be any problem, please let me know. Aren't both of the following equivalent:

1: If there be any problem, please let me know.
2: If there is any problem, please let me know.

Thanks for the guidance.
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Should there be any problem, please let me know.
If there is any problem, please let me know.
If there be any problem, please let me know.- This one is archaic nowadays. The other 2 are fine and synonymous.
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Jackson6612"be" is present subjunctive. The sentence "If there be any problem, please let me know" supposes (or, imagines) a situation, hence a subjunctive case. So, not taking into consideration the 'archaicness', don't you think the use "be" is more appropriate? Please guide me.
I think it can be interpreted as a shortened form of 'if there should be'. For all intents and purposes, something determined to be archaic is probably never preferable to something more commonly used.
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Mister MicawberShould there be any problem, please let me know.If there is any problem, please let me know.If there be any problem, please let me know.- This one is archaic nowadays. The other 2 are fine and synonymous.
Thanks, Mr. M.

"be" is present subjunctive. The sentence "If there be any problem, please let me know" supposes (or, imagines) a situation, hence a subjunctive case. So, not taking into consideration the 'archaicness', don't you think the use "be" is more appropriate? Please guide me.
 Philip's reply was promoted to an answer.
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No. It cannot be more appropriate if it is no longer in active use.
Philip gave a good answer. The more widespread usage is preferable. Archaic forms might be used in a historical novel.