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1) Are subjectless clauses only used if they have adverbial properties? In other words, if it were only adjectival in function, would it not be used?

I will exemplify my case:

Afraid and worried, I am not very skilled in English.

This adjective phrase is adjectival and has no relationship (adverbial) to the clause. It only modifies the subject.

If I were to alter the main clause, it now has adverbial properties, correct?

Afraid and worried, I slinked past my parents and out the front door, turning the knob with a loud creek.

(Sorry, I embellished a little on this sentence). Now it has an adverbial property while still retaining its adjective function.

2) Does this mean that phrases of this type should only be included if they are adverbial, relating to the entire clause?

Thanks
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English 1b3Are subjectless clauses only used if they have adverbial properties?
No. Subjectless clauses are used for other purposes. For example, imperatives are subjectless. Call the police immediately.

It also depends on your definition of clause. I'm anxious to go, in some analytical methods, has the subjectless clause to go.
___________

Your analysis of the "afraid and worried" sentences strikes me as essentially correct. It is not at all unusual for a phrase of that type to have both adjectival and adverbial properties.
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English 1b3Does this mean that phrases of this type should only be included if they are adverbial, relating to the entire clause?
No. Not at all.

CJ
Sorry, I should have been more specific with my terminology.
CalifJimYour analysis of the "afraid and worried" sentences strikes me as essentially correct. It is not at all unusual for a phrase of that type to have both adjectival and adverbial properties.
Would you say then that both sentences with 'afraid and worried' are grammatical? Semantically, the former just doesn't seem right. As I said, when I read such a construction, I naturally try and form an adverbial connection between the preceding phrase and the main clause. This one has no relation.

Cheers
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Would you say then that both sentences with 'afraid and worried' are grammatical? Yes.
Semantically, the former just doesn't seem right. Maybe so, just slightly, but that doesn't make it ungrammatical. Strictly speaking, grammar is syntax, not semantics. As Chomsky famously pointed out, the following sentence is perfectly grammatical, regardless of what a failure it is semantically.

Colorless green ideas sleep furiously.

Emotion: smile
CJ
I have never heard that quote before, but I must say it made me laugh.

It may be grammatical, but one can't call it good writing...surely.

Cheers
Please pardon my forwardness.

Sometimes, the way you phrased and structure your question and sentences really lost me. I think we had similiar discussions sometime back.
English 1b3
Afraid and worried, I am not very skilled in English.

This adjective phrase is adjectival and has no relationship (adverbial) to the clause. It only modifies the subject.

I can't connect the dots between "being afraid and worried" and "being unskillful" and see no adjectival element in "afriad and worried" but adverbial. I don't like to disagree because it triggers reactions of the negative kind. But I really have a difficult time. I would offer a similiar sentence to make a comparison. Pehaps, you can disagree with my approach.

Being afraid and scare of the dark, Mary doesn't like to be alone.

[ adverbial made of adjectives ] [ main clause ]

Question: Why doesn't Mary like to be alone.

Reason: (she is) afraid and scare of the dark.
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dimsumexpressPlease pardon my forwardness.

Sometimes, the way you phrase and structure your questions and sentences really loses me. I think we had a similiar discussion sometime back.
English 1b3
Afraid and worried, I am not very skilled in English.

This adjective phrase is adjectival and has no relationship (adverbial) to the clause. It only modifies the subject.

I can't connect the dots between "being afraid and worried" and "being unskillful" and see no adjectival element in "afriad and worried," but I do see an adverbial element. I don't like to disagree because it triggers reactions of the negative kind. But I really have a difficult time. I will offer a similiar sentence to make a comparison. Pehaps, you can disagree with my approach.

Being afraid and scare of the dark, Mary doesn't like to be alone.

[ adverbial made of adjectives ] [ main clause ]

Question: Why doesn't Mary like to be alone.

Reason: (she is) afraid and scare of the dark.

Thanks for the input. It is always good to hear opinions, opinions and more opinions. As you guessed, I don't agree. But that's OK. We expected this. Perhaps, we disagree because one of us is wrong, or, hopefully, we disagree because we have different methods, terminology and interpretaions.

Here is one sentence. Would you call this an adjective phrase, or an adverbial phrase?

Tired and hungry, I walked to the bathroom and washed my hands.

You don't have to thank me for my input. I just have a habit of sticking my nose in places where it should not be. We definitely have different mindsets when it comes to composing sentences.
English 1b3Tired and hungry, I walked to the bathroom and washed my hands.
I still can't connect what "tired and hungry" has to do with " walked to the bathroom and washed my hands". If there is no relevence, it matters little if it's adverbial or adjectival.

But if I may change it a little: Feeling thirsty and hungry, I got up and went to the kitchen for something to eat. The bold part is adverbial. I am very comfortable saying that.

English 1b3I will offer a similiar sentence to make a comparison. Pehaps, you can disagree with my approach.
I used "would" for being less imposing. I can tell the difference between the two.

By the way, we had sesveral "discussions" in adverbials as in plural. not just one!
English 1b3I think we had a similiar discussion sometime back.
dimsumexpress
I still can't connect what "tired and hungry" has to do with " walked to the bathroom and washed my hands". If there is no relevence, it matters little if it's adverbial or adjectival.


It has no relation to the predicate of the main clause. That's what CJ and I have been saying. It doesn't relate to the predicate, but rather to the subject, describing the subject. Thus, it is adjectival.

In your reworded sentence, it now has an adverbial element to it, since it relates to the predicate, answering why I went to the kitchen.
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