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Boss: Mary, where have you been for the last 3 hours?
Mary: My son fell sick and I got to arrange for someone to take care of him.
Boss: I see. How's he?
Mary: He came down with a fever last night but after taking a fever medication, his fever came down to 100. This morning he looked better but when I came into the office, he called me and was pretty sick. I left you a note on your desk before I left to take him to the doctor.
Boss: Do you want to take the day off?

Are there any mistakes?
Thanks in advance.
Comments  
Boss: Mary, where have you been for the last 3 hours?
Mary: My son fell sick and I had got to arrange for someone to take care of him.
Boss: I see. How's is he?
Mary: He came down with a fever last night but after taking a fever (not needed - he took medication) medication, his fever dropped (to avoid repeating 'came down') came down to 100. This morning he looked better, but when I got to came into the office, he called me and was pretty sick. I left (you) a note on your desk before I went (to avoid repetition of left) left to take (or just - before I took) him to the doctor.
Boss: Do you want to take the day off?
YES PLEASE!
HAHA. Thanks Optilang.
I have a couple of questions

1. I had got to arrange (Is it wrong or a matter of preference?)
2. How's is he? (Same question, wrong or a matter of preference?)
3. when I got to came into the office (Is it wrong or is it because you tried to avoid repetition?)
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1. I had got to arrange (Is it wrong or a matter of preference?) I had to do something. I would never say I got to do something referring to the past. Maybe it is acceptable in American English - I don't know. I've got to do something this afternoon - is ok.
2. How's is he? (Same question, wrong or a matter of preference?) - How's he? - on its own doesn't sound natural to me. How's he doing/feeling? - is ok. Again, maybe it works in American English - I don't know.
I saw Fred last week. - Oh, how is he?
I saw Fred last week - Oh, how's he doing these days.
3. when I got to came into the office (Is it wrong or is it because you tried to avoid repetition?) When I came into the office suggests to me that the phone rang as I was coming into/or just completing the action of coming into the office. Perhaps after I got/came to the office would remove this feeling - but came into the office for me, has more emphasis on the action of entering the office. Just my feeling.
Thanks, Optilang. I wonder what other native speakers have to say. Hopefully, someone will give some comments.
American:

1. I have to is the same as I've got to, but I got to is nonstandards. (You will hear "I gotta go!" in very informal situations.)

2. As above, you can contract "he's" (or the other personal pronoun+to be) when there's another verb: He's doing well, I'm going soon, but can't use them by themselves.

3. The other changes to avoid repetition are all style. None were wrong, and I would use "When I left to take him to the doctor" because the key part for the employee is that she left the office, not that she went anywhere in particular.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Thank you, American Emotion: smile