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my wife's uncle Sid, who was a rather boring old geezer[/nq]^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
South African irony?

Reinhold (Rey) Aman
AUEer Emeritus & Eremitus
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
«Pensad siempre en AUE y dedicad, con amor y devoción, lo mejor de vuestros esfuerzos a los AUEers». -Los Reyes
Yes. For many years I was in correspondence with a woman in America who styled herself "Mrs Paul D. Robinson". ... I would addres her if I ever met her. One couldn't really go up to her and say "Hi Paul".

You could have tried "And here's to you."
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Yes. For many years I was in correspondence with a woman in America who styled herself "Mrs Paul D. Robinson". ... her and say "Hi Paul". The formality of it led me to think she would probably expect "Ma'am" at least.

Awww, Steve, gimme a break! (g) If an American gives his/her name as "firstname - Last name", we're dissed for trying to create instant intimacy of the sort we're told it takes years to achieve in Europe. Now, here you are, fussing because she used the formality of her title, as per the etiquette books of the 1960s and 1970s.

Geez.
Cheryl
to
That's interesting stuff, thanks. Next time, though, it will confuse us simpletons less severely if you post at the bottom, as we tend to expect! You may have been too busy to notice that we do it that way here.

Tara, the "here" in Mike's post is s.g.britain
Cheryl
Yes. For many years I was in correspondence with a woman in America who styled herself "Mrs Paul D. Robinson". ... her and say "Hi Paul". The formality of it led me to think she would probably expect "Ma'am" at least.

She was using a normal mode of expression. If she had wanted to she could have signed correspondence with her given name, Frances, otherwise she would have been addressed as "Mrs Robinson". What's the problem? The custom in England was to use "Mrs Paul Robinson" until her husband died, at which point she'd become "Mrs Frances Robinson". It was a neat wat to distinguish wives from widows. I don't know, but I'm guessing that divorcées would also have adopted the "Mrs Frances Robinson" form. Nowadays anything goes.

As a matter of interest three women of my acquaintance now call themselves "Frances".
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francis muir filted:
She was using a normal mode of expression. If she had wanted to she could have signed correspondence with her ... I don't know, but I'm guessing that divorcées would also have adopted the "Mrs Frances Robinson" form. Nowadays anything goes.

When last people paid any attention to those etiquette books, divorcées weren't allowed to adopt....r
Yes. For many years I was in correspondence with a woman in America who styled herself "Mrs Paul D. Robinson".

That was the standard for married women in my youth, my mother always signed things that way. Many still use that form.
It was many years before I discovered that her own name was Frances. Until then I wondered how I would ... her and say "Hi Paul". The formality of it led me to think she would probably expect "Ma'am" at least.

According to etiquette, you should have called her Mrs. Robinson (somebody else already made the obvious joke abou that). It would then be incumbent upon her to provide you with a less formal name if she desired that you use it.
Brian Rodenborn
Peter Norman: Matti Lamprhey:

... I suspect "Robin" is the usual female form in the US; it's the UK where Robyn is reserved for that.

When Isaac Asimov's beautiful, blonde, blue-eyed daughter was born and his wife suggested the name Robin, he objected on the grounds that that could be a man's name, and they settled on Robyn. But that was 1955, and it might be different now.

According to http://thenamereport.com Robin as a male started becoming popular around 1920 and as a female name about a decade later. In the 50's both peaked in popularity, although the female usage was somewhat higher. Robyn followed the general trend of the female Robin, but was of lesser popularity along the curve.
In the past several years, all three names have declined sharply, with the male Robin off the charts.
Robin (Male)
- -
Year 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2001 2000 Rank 600 563 580 589 640 678 765 790 852 901 1000 1000

Robin (Female)
- -
Year 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 Rank 213 236 276 285 350 370 374 436 513 552 604 707 602

Robyn (Female)
- -
Year 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 Rank 325 347 358 389 464 497 479 504 478 621 690 811 689
Brian Rodenborn
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Yes. For many years I was in correspondence with a woman in America who styled herself "Mrs Paul D. Robinson". ... her and say "Hi Paul". The formality of it led me to think she would probably expect "Ma'am" at least.

I'm baffled by your bafflement. Why wouldn't "Mrs Robinson" be the obvious choice? If she preferred something else, she would tell you.

Michael West
Melbourne, Australia
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