1 8 9 10  12 13 14 18
Yes. For many years I was in correspondence with a ... me to think she would probably expect "Ma'am" at least.

I'm baffled by your bafflement. Why wouldn't "Mrs Robinson" be the obvious choice? If she preferred something else, she would tell you.

Exactly, even if you would like to know a bit about her for your files. Here's to you, Mrs. Robinson.
Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany

"it's the network..." "The Journey is the reward" (Email Removed) Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com Embedded software/hardware/analog Info for designers: http://www.speff.com
It was many years before I discovered that her own ... me to think she would probably expect "Ma'am" at least.

Awww, Steve, gimme a break! (g) If an American gives his/her name as "firstname - Last name", we're dissed for ... are, fussing because she used the formality of her title, as per the etiquette books of the 1960s and 1970s.

Well, I'm not in Europe.
In South Africa, in certain circles, formality was expected. In Afrikans universities, for example, university professors were always addresed as "Prof", and in the third person. Advocates (BrE=barristers) were addressed as "Advokaat" and in newspapers were referred to as "Adv. So and So". Surgeons were addresed as "Dr", and they could never understand why surgeons who had trained in England insisted on being addressed as "Mr".

Steve Hayes
E-mail: (Email Removed)
Web: http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7783/
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
to

That's interesting stuff, thanks. Next time, though, it will confuse ... busy to notice that we do it that way here.

Tara, the "here" in Mike's post is s.g.britain

I think Mike intended it to refer to "Here in Usenet".

Steve Hayes
E-mail: (Email Removed)
Web: http://www.geocities.com/hayesstw/stevesig.htm http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/books.htm
It seems like surnames often become first names in males, then later, they become female first names. Examples: Allison, Taylor, Tiffany, Cameron

"Allison"Alison is the diminutive of Alice and "Taylor"have not met a child named Taylor (before the poresent decade or so, ... can participate too') before it was a surname? Not sure about Cameron.surname adapted to forename, which doesn't exactly count

Eve McLaughlin
Author of the McLaughlin Guides for family historians Secretary Bucks Genealogical Society
I've just been reading "A suitable vengeance" by Elizabeth George, and have found it rather disconcerting to read about a ... And it appears to stem from one of the Puritan style names, since in the C17 it occurs as Sindenye.

Sidney, .like Denis, Julian, Cecil, Francis, Douglas, Philip, Nicholas, Laurence, and in Scotland, James and Giles, was a female name before ever it was a male one. And latterly Leslie and Shirley have gone the other way.
I've read a number of other books by Elizabeth George she writes wodunits,

not all tghat well, since she is over romantic about the aritsoicracy. Still, that is Amercan writers for you.

Eve McLaughlin
Author of the McLaughlin Guides for family historians Secretary Bucks Genealogical Society
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
The character in the book was Sidney, not Sydney, and it was disconcerting to see the pronouns "she" and "her" ... in the 1890s of the paired names, Kate and Sidney, steak and kidney pudding became known as Kate and Sidney

Eve McLaughlin
Author of the McLaughlin Guides for family historians Secretary Bucks Genealogical Society
"Allison"

Alison is the diminutive of Alice

Alison originated as a matronymic surname "son of Alice".
Alison originated as a matronymic surname "son of Alice".

Not according to Hanks & Hodges' Dictionary of First Names :

Alison (f.) Scottish, English, and French: from a very popular medieval Norman diminutive of ALICE, formed by the addition of the diminutive suffix "-on". In spite of its medieval popularity, the name virtually died out in England in the 15th centure. However, it survived in Scotland, with the result that until its revival in England in the 20th century the name had a strongly Scottish flavour.
-Aaron J. Dinkin
Dr. Whom
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
When I was lived in Houston in the 60s, the middle-aged woman who owned the house next door was named Douglas. And the elderly man across the street was Shirley. Not sure about the spellings.
Anne
Show more