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Django Cat typed thus: We trashed the Princess here (gosh, how time flies) in December 2002:

Thanks David. I learn from your posting there that I've got to my fifth decade without knowing Prince and Princess ... the Duke and Duchess of Kent. How can I have missed this? How many of these bloody people are there?

They're a big family. See
http://genealogy.euweb.cz/wettin/wettin9.html for details.

Don Aitken
Mail to the addresses given in the headers is no longer being read. To mail me, substitute "clara.co.uk" for "freeuk.com".
Eve McLaughlin
Author of the McLaughlin Guides for family historians Secretary Bucks Genealogical Society
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Eve is right - and wrong. Her records don't go back, for example, to St. Nicholas. She's really talking about Births, Christenings, Marriages & Deaths in the Briddish Aisles, and I don't think St Nick can be
found therein. Understand that genealogists are very focused on the world they inhabit. I should know, I am one.
You had better believe it, otherwise you will be continually astounded as your experience of older parish records etc grows.

Eve is right - and wrong. Her records don't go back, for example, to St. Nicholas. She's really talking about Births, Christenings, Marriages & Deaths in theDon't talk rubbish - your viewpoint may be limited but don't argue from that.

Eve McLaughlin
Author of the McLaughlin Guides for family historians Secretary Bucks Genealogical Society
But it did remind me that you can't assume that a person is male or female because of their name!

While I was doing data-entry from a published genealogy, I kept tripping over things like Thomas X married Fellicity Z; They had: Douglas, Thomas, Cecil, Michael and Amelia. Ok, no problems; four sons and a daughter. But then, in the next chapter/generation, here's Cecil marrying George! Ummm, OK, one of 'em has to be female (at least, back in the 1840s, they did!) and, since their children have George's last name, the female has to be Cecil. It was MONTHS before I realized that Cecil and Cecilia were the same person, only in the first instance, it was being said Suh-SEAL rather than SEE-sul, and since I KNEW a woman named Cecilia who was routinely called Suh-SEAL, I felt much better. (g)

The gender of A.G. who married T. R. and had no issue, however, remains a mystery.
Cheryl
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
But it did remind me that you can't assume that a person is male or female because of their name!

While I was doing data-entry from a published genealogy, I kept tripping over things like Thomas X married Fellicity Z; ... than SEE-sul, and since I KNEW a woman named Cecilia who was routinely called Suh-SEAL, I felt much better. (g)

Around here "Cecil" is pronounced "Sessil".
But perhaps these mark a reverse trend someone said that once a name (like Sidney) becomes popular for females, it stiops being used for males. But this seems to be going the other way.

Steve Hayes
E-mail: (Email Removed)
Web: http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7783/
The use of first names at first meeting is, in any case, dependent on circumstances. I was quite unnerved, when ... USA, to be addressed by my first name by the bank employee that I spoke to when opening an account.

Yesterday my brother had to go to his local hospital for an urgent medical problem(1). He called me before he went, so I drove around to see him there(2). While I was chatting to him a young woman entered the cubicle and announced "Hello. I'm Caroline. I'm a doctor." She then looked around in some confusion, obviously wondering which of us was the patient, so I left quietly.
I still think this is an odd way for a doctor to introduce herself.

(1) He's much better now.
(2) Before I could ask after him at the reception desk the nurse there told me I shouldn't wander around the hospital, but I should stay where I was placed. One would have thought that she had seen identical twins before. I wouldn't mind so much, but the same thing happened the last time I went to that hospital, around five years ago.
Graeme Thomas
The use of first names at first meeting is, in ... bank employee that I spoke to when opening an account.

Yesterday my brother had to go to his local hospital for an urgent medical problem(1). He called me before he ... mind so much, but the same thing happened the last time I went to that hospital, around five years ago.

Perhaps they'd been looking for you all that time.

Fran
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
(2) Before I could ask after him at the reception desk the nurse there told me I shouldn't wander around ... mind so much, but the same thing happened the last time I went to that hospital, around five years ago.

Still identical eh? Feh!

John Dean
Oxford
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