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Some names formed in this fashionable way draw on the stock of traditional English-language girl's names. But, you say, we've ... Catherine, for instance. Yes, but how do you explain Kathryn? That wouldn't have arisen were it not for this vogue.

You're unaware that that is one of the old spellings? Ancestry World has hundreds of records like these:
Name: Kathryn BRABROOK
* Birth: ABT 1597 in Of Ringstead,Northampton,England

Name: Kathryn COLGAN
* Birth: 1617 in Ireland
* Death: 1697 in Ireland
Name: Kathryn Fish
* Christening: 15 APR 1582 Great Bowden,Leicestershire,England

Best Donna Richoux
that Cecil and Cecilia were the same person, only in the first instance, it was being said Suh-SEAL rather than SEE-sul, and since I KNEW a woman named Cecilia who was routinely called Suh-SEAL, I felt much better. (g)

In English, Cecil is CEHsill, whatever gender. Cecile is CEHseel, but that is French or modern. Cecilia is Ceh SILeea

Eve McLaughlin
Author of the McLaughlin Guides for family historians Secretary Bucks Genealogical Society
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In English, Cecil is CEHsill, whatever gender.

How are you defining "English"? Among American English speakers, at least, there are numerous "Cecils" (at least male ones) where the pronunciation is "SEE-sill".
Cecile is CEHseel, but that is French or modern. Cecilia is Ceh SILeea

I'd expect "Cecilia" to be three syllables (middle syllable like "seal").
In English, Cecil is CEHsill, whatever gender.

How are you defining "English"? Among American English speakers, at least, there are numerous "Cecils" (at least male ones) where the pronunciation is "SEE-sill".

I know that Cecille B. DeMille had the "SEE-sill" pronunciation, but Cecille and Cecil aren't the same name.
Cecile is CEHseel, but that is French or modern. Cecilia is Ceh SILeea

I'd expect "Cecilia" to be three syllables (middle syllable like "seal").

Simon and Garfunkel definitely made it a three syllable name .

Cathy
I've just been reading "A suitable vengeance" by Elizabeth George, ... to read about a female character with the name "Sidney".

So what's new? It was never common, but it is found more than a few times. And it appears to ... a female name before ever it was a male one. And latterly Leslie and Shirley have gone the other way.

Really? It would be great if you could share the documentation for those claims, especially the one that "Sidney" was derived from a Puritan name.
Thanks,
Cathy
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that Cecil and Cecilia were the same person, only in ... who was routinely called Suh-SEAL, I felt much better. (g)

In English, Cecil is CEHsill, whatever gender. Cecile is CEHseel, but that is French or modern. Cecilia is Ceh SILeea

You missed Cecily, which I would pronounce "SISsilly", or something like that.
Fran
[email protected], you're breaking my heart
You're shaking my confidence daily

Steve Hayes
E-mail: (Email Removed)
Web: http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7783/
How are you defining "English"?The language as correctly spoken in England (and there is a lowe class version Sissill)

Among American English speakers, at

least, there are numerous "Cecils" (at least male ones) where ... the elongated medial vowel is modern and tending to French.

Simon and Garfunkel definitely made it a three syllable name .In the interests of rhyming with steal-ya?

Eve McLaughlin
Author of the McLaughlin Guides for family historians Secretary Bucks Genealogical Society
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
In English, Cecil is CEHsill, whatever gender. Cecile is CEHseel, but that is French or modern. Cecilia is Ceh SILeea

You missed Cecily, which I would pronounce "SISsilly", or something like that.Cecily is Cess i lee. Cicely is Siss eh lee - at least, if correctly pronounced

Eve McLaughlin
Author of the McLaughlin Guides for family historians Secretary Bucks Genealogical Society
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