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Really? It would be great if you could share the documentation for those claims, especially the one that "Sidney" was derived from a Puritan name.The name first occurs as Sin-deny and mutates as affected by the surname of the gentry family.

And if you study parish registers, wills, deeds and other oold more you will find all these names. Personal research is recommended, which will help you understand things. I have n't time for a detailed history lesson distilling the knowledge of 60 years at the moment.

Eve McLaughlin
Author of the McLaughlin Guides for family historians Secretary Bucks Genealogical Society
Simon and Garfunkel definitely made it a three syllable name .

In the interests of rhyming with steal-ya?

Not at all. The lyrics are:
Cecelia
By Paul Simon
Cecilia, you're breaking my heart,
you're shaking my confidence daily.
Oh, Cecilia, I'm down on my knees;
I'm begging you please to come home.
Cecilia, you're breaking my heart,
you're shaking my confidence daily
Oh, Cecilia, I'm down on my knees;
I'm begging you please to come home.
Come on home
Makinglove in the afternoon
with Cecilia up in my bedroom.
I got up to wash my face,
when I come back to bed someone's taken my place.
Cecilia, you're breaking my heart,
you're shaking my confidence daily.
Oh, Cecilia, I'm down on my knees;
I'm begging you please to come home.
Jubilation, she loves me again,
I fall on the floor and I'm laughing,
Jubilation, she loves me again,
I fall on the floor and I'm laughing
So, as you see, there was no attempt to rhyme 'Cecelia' with another word in the song.
Thanks,
Cathy
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You missed Cecily, which I would pronounce "SISsilly", or something like that.

Cecily is Cess i lee. Cicely is Siss eh lee - at least, if correctly pronounced

The correct pronunciation is that used by the person who has that name. The only "Cecily" I knew pronounced her name "Sissilly".

Fran
Really? It would be great if you could share the documentation for those claims, especially the one that "Sidney" was derived from a Puritan name.

The name first occurs as Sin-deny and mutates as affected by the surname of the gentry family.

So, you're claiming that anyone with the first name of Sidney has the name from this obscure Puritan name, and not from any of the families (may of which pre-date the Puritan movement) who had it as a surname?
And if you study parish registers, wills, deeds and other oold more you will find all these names. Personal research ... understand things. I have n't time for a detailed history lesson distilling the knowledge of 60 years at the moment.

I'v always been given to understand that in genealogy, a person should document their facts. It's a pity that you can't be bothered to provide the documentation for what you claim, especially if it's all stored in your head. If you have nothing written down about all that you've discovered over the past 60 years, then when you die, it will be lost, and that will be a shame.
Cathy
Really? It would be great if you could share the documentation for those claims, especially the one that "Sidney" was derived from a Puritan name.

The name first occurs as Sin-deny and mutates as affected by the surname of the gentry family. And if you ... understand things. I have n't time for a detailed history lesson distilling the knowledge of 60 years at the moment.

Oh Boy. The classic BS answer.
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My question is, has Sidney become a common female name ... only one who finds this strange as a female name?

Certainly is increasingly popular in the US. From my favorite name site: Sydney (Female) - - Year 1990 1991 1992 ... 2001 2002 Rank 155 138 127 111 77 44 41 35 29 24

Brian,
This is interesting. I knew a girl called Sidney at school. As the name was out of fashion for boys by then no one thought it was strange; quite the reverse. It seemed a 'cool' name to have. I don't know why she was called Sidney. Maybe it was her mother's maiden name? That sometimes accounts for Girls having names like Sidney, Cameron, and so on. I will check out the web site you reccommended. Danielle
Really? It would be great if you could share the documentation for those claims, especially the one that "Sidney" was derived from a Puritan name.

The name first occurs as Sin-deny and mutates as affected by the surname of the gentry family.

Actually, I think you'll find that it originates from Saint Denis (say it in French), and thence Dionysus.
Jim Gunson
That is certainly part of the name stock from which ... by Kylie Minogue, of course) Destiny (Destanie etc.) (abstract noun)

It is my theory that the popularity of names given by white American mothers can be directly linked to the ... for a script writer to come up with a new name and follow the naming records to see the effect.

Areff had earlier written
In general, Hiberno-Britosupremacism usually manifests itself in the area of child-naming in the giving of names to girls wherein the ... a name ending in /i/ pronunciation-wise (for standard AmE) and (c) that final syllable must orthographically be -y or -ey.

Black American mothers do not seem to follow this pattern. They seem to take one name - Tamika, for example - and build new variations on that name: Tammyika, Tamshika, Tamalika, etc.

This is exactly what I was thinking of. This idea (of treating as girl's
name something which either doesn't yet exist or else does exist but isn't usually used as a girl's name, because it sounds like a girl's name) is more prevalent among blacks than among whites. Once something has gone from not usually being used as a girl's name to being known as
a girl's name, the above parenthetical description no longer covers it.
Thus a culture where thousands of such names are used shows this practice
more than one in which maybe a few tens of such names are used. So I observe with American blacks.
As for what sounds like a girl's name, Areff mentioned final /i/; I added a few more.
However, there is a greater variety of building blocks for the synthetic
girl's names used by blacks, that I'm thinking of. Boy's names too. Cf

http://www.gaminggeeks.org/Resources/KateMonk/England-Firstnames/African-American/Inventions-Male... http://www.gaminggeeks.org/Resources/KateMonk/England-Firstnames/African-American/Inventions-Fema...

or (resp.)
http://tinyurl.com/2ojoz
http://tinyurl.com/32hr6

Richard Sabey Visit the r.p.crosswords competition website cryptic fan at hotmail.com http://www.rsabey.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/rpc / Someone is sending German-language spam with a forged From: line, purporting to be from me. Please be informed: I spam nobody.
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Actually, I think you'll find that it originates from Saint Denis (say it in French), and thence Dionysus.Dionysius/a is anglicised as Denis, far more often female in England before the C10, when the Irish usage started to be imported. (Exception, the Hampson family).

Eve McLaughlin
Author of the McLaughlin Guides for family historians Secretary Bucks Genealogical Society
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