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Actually, I think you'll find that it originates from Saint Denis (say it in French), and thence Dionysus.Dionysius/a is anglicised as Denis, far more often female in England before the C10, when the Irish usage started to be imported. (Exception, the Hampson family).

Eve McLaughlin
Author of the McLaughlin Guides for family historians Secretary Bucks Genealogical Society
The name first occurs as Sin-deny and mutates as affected by the surname of the gentry family.

So, you're claiming that anyone with the first name of Sidney has the name from this obscure Puritan name, and ... appear as Sindeny, and the use of surname forenames in general tends to be later (with exceptions for political reasons).

Really it is no use wasting time on people who lack background, expect to be fed great masses of information, which with a little effort they could collect for themselves. Do READ a few books, RESEARCH a lot of registers. It will do you good.
I think you are either extremely stupid or trolling. Or both. In either case, boring. And that is the last I wish to hear from you, ever.
If you have nothing written down about all that you've discovered over the past 60 years, then when you die, it will be lost, and that will be a shame.

Potty resoning - the facts are all there for anyone to see. If they are prepared to make a little effort.

Eve McLaughlin
Author of the McLaughlin Guides for family historians Secretary Bucks Genealogical Society
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
It's a pity that you can't be bothered to provide the documentation for what you claim, especially if it's all ... discovered over the past 60 years, then when you die, it will be lost, and that will be a shame.

Is this assuming the cause of death will be due to a co-ordinated Al-Quaida attack on all city Archives and Register Offices in the United Kingdom? I can only assume that's why nobody else would be able to research her 'lost discoveries'.
As for the lady not documenting anything, I borrowed one of her books from Hanley Library today, so it strikes me she's at least written something down. ;-)

Lee J. Moore
Let us hob and nob with Death - Tennyson
Denis, far more often female in England before the C10, when the Irish usage started to be imported.


C10? Is C20 intended? (I'm guessing here, based on comments by EG Withycombe.)
Denis, far more often female in England before the C10, when the Irish usage started to be imported.


C10? Is C20 intended? (I'm guessing here, based on comments by EG Withycombe.)
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
And, IF I did live in England AND had researched my ancestors back to the parishes there, then I would ... about the subject.have and I highly resent your implication that my inability to hop a plane and fly to England

I think we can live quite happily without your presence.

Eve McLaughlin
Author of the McLaughlin Guides for family historians Secretary Bucks Genealogical Society
Denis, far more often female in England before the C10, when the Irish usage started to be imported.

C10? Is C20 intended? (I'm guessing here, based on comments by EG Withycombe.)

C19, late. Kathleen came in first, ex Kathleen Mavourneen and Yeats perhaps. Norah (and Honora) soon followed. Eileen was rather later, and first found in the areas with a lot of Irish migrants (Lancs, Notts, Durham, Staffs and Birmingham (and London of course). Eileen had a real non-Irish vogue in the 1920s and 1930s, and Maureen a little later still..
Funny, I did correct that typo, but the computer seems to have clung to the error.

Eve McLaughlin
Author of the McLaughlin Guides for family historians Secretary Bucks Genealogical Society
And, IF I did live in England AND had researched ... England, I can't envision myself doing that any time soom,

If you are so dim you do not realise you can access a large number of parish registers via Mormon FH centres, worldwide, then you know very little about the subject.have

On the contrary. I haven't yet needed to search through the English records, and, having been to Salt Lake City as well as my local family history library, I know fully well what they have available. But that has nothing to do with your claim that 'Sidney' comes solely from a puritan name.
All I've asked is for you to state your source for that claim, a request that you refuse, which is your right, of course. I have not, as you have tried to insinuate, asked you to do research for me. I've simply asked you to state your source. In what parish did you find your proof? What record? I'm more than willing to go and look up the record once I know just which record you're getting your proof from.

We have a saying on our side of the Atlantic either put up, or shut up. Can you, or can you not, prove that 'Sidney' comes solely from the puritan name 'Sindenye' and has nothing whatsoever to do with the surname of 'Sidney' which existed in England prior to the puritan movement? It's a simple question, and if you can definitely reply 'yes' to the question, then you should also be able to provide your source. I can write that I'm descended from Henry VIII and use your evasions as my defense of my claim, but, without proof, it's a meaningless claim. And your claim of that name origin is meaningless until you can prove otherwise.
and I highly resent your implication that my inability to hop a plane and fly to England

I think we can live quite happily without your presence.

Glad to see that you speak for everyone on alt.genealogy . I replied to your comments in a pleasant manner, yet you have insulted me over and over again. I did not insult your intelligence. I did not call you names. I did not reply in a haughty or snippy manner until you attacked me.
Cathy Roberts
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
If you are so dim you do not realise you ... centres, worldwide, then you know very little about the subject.have

On the contrary. I haven't yet needed to search through the English records, and, having been to Salt Lake City ... they have available. But that has nothing to do with your claim that 'Sidney' comes solely from a puritan name.

That is not precisely what Eve said, honey. She said that the USE of the name comes from the Puritans. While I share your regional distaste for the notion, that doesn't make the statement incorrect. WHY the Puritans thought it was a nifty name, we'll never know and dang if I can see why it matters.
BTW Challenging Eve's credentials is a particularly hen-witted sort of thing to do on 3 of the 5 groups on which this post appears. It's rather like telling Helen Hinchcliff she's wrong.
Good luck with your research.
Cheryl
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