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When I was about 10 years old, I was certain I'd found an error when I read a blurb that used the masculine pronoun for Joyce Kilmer.

Cece
I've just been reading "A suitable vengeance" by Elizabeth George, andhave found it rather disconcerting to read about a female character with thename "Sidney".

I've met more female Sidneys and Sydneys than male ones. Almost all of them were in England.

Peacenik
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Isn't there some evidence that, once a name becomes popular as a female name, it falls out of favour very quickly as a male name?

Perhaps it might be, at least partly, the other way round that when aname loses popularity as a male name, it becomes available as a female one. Someone mentioned Douglas is Brian next?

It seems like surnames often become first names in males, then later, they become female first names.
Examples: Allison, Taylor, Tiffany, Cameron

Peacenik
It seems like surnames often become first names in males, then later, they become female first names. Examples: Allison, Taylor, Tiffany, Cameron

"Allison" and "Taylor" are Hiberno-Britic(TM) surnames, so that's what you'd sort of expect. Wasn't "Tiffany" a given name (= BrE 'Christian name, but Buddhists can participate too') before it was a surname? Not sure about Cameron.
I challenge anyone to come up with an example of a non-Hiberno-Britic(tm) surname(1) that has become a popular first name for either males or females. This practice is pure and laughable Hiberno-Britosupremacism, plain and simple. Coop, j'accuse!
(1)Including surnames that are Norman French in origin.
Peacenik filted:
It seems like surnames often become first names in males, then later, they become female first names. Examples: Allison, Taylor, Tiffany, Cameron

Was there really once a male with the first name Tiffany?...

I used to work with a woman whose first name was Hamilton...one day she was talking about her family and managed to mention her husband (Morgan) and her daughter (Payton) in the same sentence...I interrupted to ask "doesn't anybody in your family have a first name?"...
I don't think she ever quite forgave me for that..r
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Two more androgynous names that people have forgotten Julian and ... US the female form of the late is usually Robyn)

I don't think I've ever encountered a female Julian. Julie-Anne is a horse of a different colour.

There was Julian of Norwich.

Steve Hayes
E-mail: (Email Removed)
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I don't think I've ever encountered a female Julian. Julie-Anne is a horse of a different colour.

My house was occupied by a Nicholas Heron in 1901 and she was the owner's sister-in-law.
Isn't there some evidence that, once a name becomes popular as a female name, it falls out of favour very quickly as a male name?

Perhaps it might be, at least partly, the other way round that when a name loses popularity as a male name, it becomes available as a female one. Someone mentioned Douglas is Brian next?

Douglas might be an exception. It appears as a female name in the 16th century (eg Douglas Howard, daughter of the first Lord Howard of Effingham, who married Elizabeth I's earl of Leicester).

Don Aitken
Mail to the addresses given in the headers is no longer being read. To mail me, substitute "clara.co.uk" for "freeuk.com".
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I don't think I've ever encountered a female Julian. Julie-Anne is a horse of a different colour.

There was Julian of Norwich.

And the current author of fantasy novels, Julian May.

Don Aitken
Mail to the addresses given in the headers is no longer being read. To mail me, substitute "clara.co.uk" for "freeuk.com".
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