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One of my second cousins was a ballet dancer and ... I'd love to know more! Haven't heard of that one!

Wha?!? Go quickly and watch the 'ballet' sequence in 'Singing in the Rain', and then I'd suggest a cold shower! http://cydcharisse.net / DC

DC, you beat me to it.
Cheers, Sage
No. But I'm aware of Miss Michael Learned.

And whenever the credits of "The Waltons" rolled we wondered exactly what she learned.

I don't know about that, but I know where she learned: she grew up in West Norwalk, and her fourth grade teacher was my children's first grade teacher. According to Mrs Smith (the teacher in question) Michael Learned's parents were very progressive and had their children call them by their first names, instead of "Mom" and "Dad".
Fran
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I challenge anyone to come up with an example of ... is pure and laughable Hiberno-Britosupremacism, plain and simple. Coop, j'accuse!

Could you point me to a list of, say, Hispanic or French surnames that didn't start out as first names, so I can be sure I'm giving you what you want?

That's your job, erk!
(1)Including surnames that are Norman French in origin.

Does that rule our Darcy/D'Arcy?

Yes.
Dylan Nicholson:
Indeed there are recent movies with female Sidneys. Scream () & Brown Sugar to name a couple.

Oh and of course there's Sydney (with the 2 y's) in the TV series Alias.

And another in "The American President" (1995).

Mark Brader, Toronto "Don't be evil."
(Email Removed) corporate policy, Google Inc.
Peter Norman:
Two more androgynous names that people have forgotten Julian and ... US the female form of the late is usually Robyn)

Matti Lamprhey:
... I suspect "Robin" is the usual female form in the US; it's the UK where Robyn is reserved for that.

When Isaac Asimov's beautiful, blonde, blue-eyed daughter was born and his wife suggested the name Robin, he objected on the grounds that that could be a man's name, and they settled on Robyn. But that was 1955, and it might be different now.
His standard description.
Mark Brader > "I do have an idea ... based on the quite obvious fact Toronto > that the number two is ridiculous and can't exist." (Email Removed) > Ben Denison (Isaac Asimov, "The Gods Themselves")

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
That obnoxious minor Royal who made a prat of herself in New York recently; Princess Michael of Kent. Does she actually have a name of her own? Or is it too German for the great British public to know what it is or something?

Her name is Marie-Christine, if I remember rightly.

But her example is not really comparable to the cases we are discussing here: "Princess Michael of Kent" is a title not a name.

Barbara
Douglas Durden.. she's a teevee reviewer for the Richmond, Virginia Times-Disgrace...
Ted
And whenever the credits of "The Waltons" rolled we wondered exactly what she learned.

You ever find out what did Della wear?

How very cruel. It looks like Friday with Perry. I could have done without that.
(aue only)

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
That obnoxious minor Royal who made a prat of herself ... great British public to know what it is or something?

Her name is Marie-Christine, if I remember rightly. But her example is not really comparable to the cases we are discussing here: "Princess Michael of Kent" is a title not a name.

Yes. For many years I was in correspondence with a woman in America who styled herself "Mrs Paul D. Robinson".
It was many years before I discovered that her own name was Frances.

Until then I wondered how I would addres her if I ever met her. One couldn't really go up to her and say "Hi Paul". The formality of it led me to think she would probably expect "Ma'am" at least.

Steve Hayes
E-mail: (Email Removed)
Web: http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7783/
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