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[nq:1]I'm writing a paper and I can't seem to determine the correct form of the word 'similar' to use in ... fairly certain that in this sentance 'similarly' needs to be an adverb modifying 'features'. Can anyone help me? Thanks, Adam
Here is my second try, but to me this sounds less clear than the first version:

"This glass cameo features an image of the head of Augustus in profile, in a similar manner as the stone cameo portrays his wife, Livia (fig. 2)."

To clear up my meaning a bit more, there are two cameos, a glass one of Augustus, and a stone one of Livia. They each portray one person, Augustus on the one hand and Livia on the other. What the cameos have in common is the manner in which they portray their subject; as a head in profile.

-Adam
[nq:1]"This glass cameo features an image of the head of Augustus in profile, in a similar manner as the stone cameo portrays his wife, Livia (fig. 2)."
Keep it simple, and forget about "similar/similarly". Perhaps:

"Both cameos feature a head in profile. The stone cameo (fig. 2) shows Augustus' wife, Livia, whilst this glass cameo shows Augustus himself."
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"This glass cameo features an image of the head of ... as the stone cameo portrays his wife, Livia (fig. 2)."

Keep it simple, and forget about "similar/similarly". Perhaps: "Both cameos feature a head in profile. The stone cameo (fig. 2) shows Augustus' wife, Livia, whilst this glass cameo shows Augustus himself."

Oh, I see now that a level of attribution was missing when I responded elsewhere. I thought Mike987 was the name of the original poster, but that was Adam Schwartz.

Mike, that "himself" up above makes it sounds like we should only are about Augustus, and Livia is a nobody. I do not see that Adam was trying to convey any comparative worth.

-- Best -- Donna Richoux
On Sat, 29 Nov 2003 19:24:35 +0100, (Email Removed) (Donna Richoux) said:

( . . . )
Mike, that "himself" up above makes it sounds like we should only are about Augustus, and Livia is a nobody.

The student is asked to think carefully about that sentence and see if they can suggest any ways to improve it.

To me, it makes it sounds like we should only are look for ways to rephrase it.

Let me hasten to add that I greatly admire Donna's postings, both for their style and for their content. I suspect she was in a hurry to get on to something else when she edited the quoted sentence.
[nq:2]"Both cameos feature a head in profile. The stone cameo (fig. 2) shows Augustus' wife, Livia, whilst this glass cameo shows Augustus himself."
Mike, that "himself" up above makes it sounds like we should only are about Augustus, and Livia is a nobody. I do not see that Adam was trying to convey any comparative worth.

The "himself" emphasises the contrast between "Augustus' wife" and "Augustus". It's interesting that you see this as implying some difference in comparative worth. Perhaps you could explain? (I'm genuinely curious.)
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the quoted material. Would you please make the effort to include such lines? It saves confusion. Thanks.
(I had said)
Mike, that "himself" up above makes it sounds like we ... see that Adam was trying to convey any comparative worth.

The "himself" emphasises the contrast between "Augustus' wife" and "Augustus". It's interesting that you see this as implying some difference in comparative worth. Perhaps you could explain? (I'm genuinely curious.)

Except for the typos I made, I don't know what I can say differently. 'Himself" puts an unwarranted emphasis on Augustus. That's what "himself" does in a construction like that.

They took it to the king himself. (Wow! All the way to the king!)

I'll believe you didn't mean the sentence to have that emphasis, but I see it, and it was not present in the original we were trying to improve, which was (at one point):

"This glass cameo features an image of the head of Augustus in profile, in a similar manner as the stone cameo portrays his wife, Livia (fig. 2)."

-- Best -- Donna Richoux
[nq:1]On Sat, 29 Nov 2003 19:24:35 +0100, (Email Removed) (Donna Richoux) said: ( . . . )
Mike, that "himself" up above makes it sounds like we should only are about Augustus, and Livia is a nobody.

The student is asked to think carefully about that sentence and see if they can suggest any ways to improve ... it. Let me hasten to add that I greatly admire Donna's postings, both for their style and for their content.

Well, I will happily put the "c" back on "care" that got dropped somehow, and I guess I'd better take the "s" off of "sounds." But anything else would just be fiddling.
I suspect she was in a hurry to get on to something else when she edited the quoted sentence.

Let's see, was that the time the kitchen timer rang or the time my daughter needed me for something?

-- est ishes -- Donna Richoux
(...)
Here is my second try, but to me this sounds less clear than the first version: "This glass cameo features ... What the cameos have in common is the manner in which they portray their subject; as a head in profile.

Try:

This glass cameo of the head of Augustus, like the stone cameo of the head of his wife Livia (fig. 2), portrays its subject in profile.

That establishes the similarity of views as crucial while keeping the focus on the glass cameo.

Some notes:

. As has been pointed out, if Livia was the only wife he ever had, her name should be made appositive to "wife" with a comma pair ("his wife, Livia, &c."), one member of which is necessarily present anyway in the casting above.

. "Full profile" is redundant, unlike "full face"; a three- quarter face view is logically possible, but not a partial profile view.

. "Similar" the adjective can rightly make the adverb "similarly", but I at least reckon it a brutish, ungainly thing, best avoided.

. Likewise (not similarly!), "feature" as a verb(1) is poor company for formal prose, and dubious company anywhere, still bearing a faint but, I think, detectible aroma of slang.

(1) "Feature" as a verb is usually transitive and active, less commonly intransitive. But what is the sense of the house on a usage like this: "The meal was featured by one of the cook's most famous dishes." That gravels me, but what do others think?

-- Cordially, Eric Walker My opinions on English are available at http://owlcroft.com/english /
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[nq:1]Your fiancee is correct. Similar is qualifying "this glass cameo". If you rearrange the order of the phrases, you get: ... of his wife Livia, features an image of the head of Augustus..." which should make the meaning and grammar clearer.
If that's what it means. I took it mean it feature the head of Augustus in a similar way, which is why I would have chosen 'similarly'. However, I don't like the sentence as it stands.

-- Rob Bannister
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