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But it's good to get amongst you all again

It's good to have you among us again. Been up to anything interesting?

(And now, where's Mike Oliver?)

Dena Jo
Email goes to denajo2 at the dot com variation of the Yahoo domain. Have I confused you? Go here:
http://myweb.cableone.net/denajo/emailme.htm
What about matti lamprhey?

Hey, I have my own movie: . Can he make that claim?

Can you say Ngaio?
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Academy/6422/rev0059.html

Matti
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Hey, I have my own movie: . Can he make that claim?

Can you say Ngaio? http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Academy/6422/rev0059.html

Forward Marsh!
I believe it was Milton Berle who used to say "ngaio, ngaio, ngaio." He truncated the end just a bit, though.

Bob Lieblich
What about it?
As it happens, when I first read Areff's post, I ... from my mention of lutefisk, which is an acquired taste.

Sorry, Ray, I'm not making myself clear. "Appetizing" is a noun, and it's what "appetizing stores" sell. Try this: . ... to get really good anywhere south of northern New Jersey. It's getting toughter to get really good appetizing anywhere.

I just love the way a thread about Simon being evil shifts into a discussion of pizzas, lox, and where to find appetising seafood. &Deities bless thread drift, the most amusing and entertaining part of newsgroups.

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Quiet part of Hertfordshire
England
I believe it was Milton Berle who used to say "ngaio, ngaio, ngaio." He truncated the end just a bit, though.

No, that was Jerome Lester Horwitz, who was born in Bath Beach, Brooklyn (Fourth Largest City in America) (then Third-Largest?).

Milton Berle was born in Harlem, on Jan Sand's Manhattan Island. (Not to be confused with ChiE "wass born ann Hairlem", which indicates Chicagoan nativity.)
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
"Maria Conlon" (Email Removed) wrote on 03 Apr 2004:
We will all fantasize about what your life is ... wrong buutons on the wrong poster, so it doesn't matter.

You fantasize about the lives of aue'ers, Franke? This sounds interesting. What have you fanatasized? Are the fantasies appropriate for a family newsgroup with readers as young as 15 (or younger) and as old as dirt (or whatever)?

I was thinking of of the sopmetimes deliciously barbed comments some posters attach to their replies. My fantasies are all topical, like the nightmare I had the night I watched a National Geographic special on monkeys: it had a much too graphic segment on the proboscis primate.

http://www.proboscis.cc/gallery/index.htm#

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
I'm glad you're getting it. Simon, there are things about ... divulge on Usenet. I respect you for making these statements.

...
For a number of reasons - some listed above - I can't imagine why anyone would want to be the ... "I was the Banana at U of F". Is this the type of thing that you've not chosen to divulge?

No, my life is much more boring than that. That was a long way to go for a punch line, Tony, but it was very funny.

Mike Bandy
Areff typed thus:
Is your objection that salmon spend part of their life ... fish (broadly including freshwater fish) or shellfish or roe etc)"

Tha' tisn't me objection a-toll, as they say in BrE. I accept that freshwater fish can be considered "seafood" in ... considered "seafood". There are other kinds of fish products that are clearly not "seafood". Canned tuna(fish) (= BrE "tinned tunny"??)

No: just "tuna" - no "fish".
is derived from that fish known as the tuna, but it is not "seafood".

David
==
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Areff typed thus:

Tha' tisn't me objection a-toll, as they say in BrE. ... are clearly not "seafood". Canned tuna(fish) (= BrE "tinned tunny"??)

No: just "tuna" - no "fish".

From the second definition under the entry for "tuna" (the second entry the first is for a type of prickly pear) in MWCD11: "*2 :* the flesh of a tuna especially when canned for use as food called also tuna fish. "

The conclusion that canning and cooking a fish can render it "non-seafood" is, frankly, bizarre.
is derived from that fish known as the tuna, but it is not "seafood".

David ==

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
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