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I think this is more about sandwiches than about seafood. ... and a shrimp sandwich are all examples of seafood sandwiches.

To me, "seafood sandwich" doesn't even seem like a recognized category. The term calls to mind an image of a ... pretty much requires that the fish not have been canned, picked, smoked, or (for the British in the audience) jellied.

You would exclude pickled herring? I mean it's got scales for goodness sake. How much fishier can you get?
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"Raymond S. Wise" (Email Removed) wrote on 04 Apr 2004:
I still don't get it. How would you characterize tuna that is preserved in foil (or is it plastic, or ... on my previous statement, the idea that any of these methods of preserving tuna can render it "non-seafood" is bizarre.

I think one has to be coastal to get it. To be quite honest, there is no seafood in Minnesota or Iowa.

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Areff (Email Removed) wrote on 04 Apr 2004:
I think this is more about sandwiches than about seafood. ... and a shrimp sandwich are all examples of seafood sandwiches.

To me, "seafood sandwich" doesn't even seem like a recognized category. The term calls to mind an image of a ... between two slices of bread, and then you have a "tuna sandwich" of a sort that is a "fish sandwich".

I agree with this.
I think "fish sandwich" pretty much requires that the fish not have been canned, picked, smoked, or (for the British in the audience) jellied.

I don't know about this, though. Sardines always canned or tinned in my experience qualify in my book as seafood. They finally began to taste fishier than olive-oily, so I had to stop eating them.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
You would exclude pickled herring? I mean it's got scales for goodness sake. How much fishier can you get?

I know I'm not the first person to make this
observation, but isn't it really weird how
this thread (which I started) has become a
lively debate about fish and seafood? I've
seen 'thread drift' before, but this one
surely takes the fish-cake?

Christopher
My e-mail address is not 'munged' in any way and is fully replyable!
Of course seafood (proper AmE definition) is available at seafood restaurants in the Middle West (like one of Coop's favorites, ... did you see anyone eat fish? Pennsylvania's sort of like the Midwest with hills, west of the mighty Susquehanna anyway.[/nq]I only lived in the Midwest for 28 years, so I don't know if I'm qualified to respond to this, but I am curious to know who these fish-averse people were or are. That there is a certain indifference to ocean fish is fairly likely, and that *is* consistent with the transportation issue, it is something of a stretch to broaden that to distaste for all fish. I believe you've mentioned noticing a large body of water to the northeast of Chicago. It happens that that lake contains numerous varieties of fish (and it used to contain a lot of others).

Those who live anywhere near the Great Lakes (possibly excepting Lake Erie) would have access to vast amounts of fresh freshwater fish. There was at one time a thriving fishing industry on the lakes. Whether that is still true, I can't say. In the part of the country I grew up in, Friday night fish fries were very popular (even among non- Catholics), and perch, trout, and whitefish were common on our menu.
It is true that environmental changes occurred over time. Chemical pollution of the lakes and rivers is an ongoing problem. Lampreys severely damaged the food-fish populations in the fifties and sixties, and zebra mussels do so today. The great smelt runs I remember from my childhood do not still take place. As fish populations dwindle, there may be a certain amount of avoidance of fish as food, but it's not because of aversion so much as price and availability.
Whether those who live farther from large fresh fish supplies are averse to or simply unfamiliar with them as a menu item is an open question, but I've seldom run across people who dislike fish as a food category. So where do you find these folks?

rzed
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I think this is more about sandwiches than about seafood. ... and a shrimp sandwich are all examples of seafood sandwiches.

To me, "seafood sandwich" doesn't even seem like a recognized category. The term calls to mind an image of a ... pretty much requires that the fish not have been canned, picked, smoked, or (for the British in the audience) jellied.

Smoked mullet between two slices of bread is not a fish sandwich? You coulda fooled me.
but it's been my observation that most Midwesterners are raised (as we sometimes say in AmE) with a very strong aversion to fish and shellfish and the like that generally exceeds what you find on, say, th'East Coast (Largest Coast in America),

Damn, Areff, but you make me laugh sometimes. I can't figure out if you are the Larry, Moe, or Curly of what other folks do.
canned, picked, smoked, or (for the British in the audience) jellied.

Er, I mean "canned, pickled, smoked, ...".

Yo, Areff. Is this intended as a slur on my halibut tree?

Bob Lieblich
Teller of fish stories
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You would exclude pickled herring? I mean it's got scales for goodness sake. How much fishier can you get?

I know I'm not the first person to make this observation, but isn't it really weird how this thread (which I started) has become a lively debate about fish and seafood? I've seen 'thread drift' before, but this one surely takes the fish-cake?

It simply serves to prove that dead fish are more interesting than Simon's evilness or your lamentations about his evilness.
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