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I only lived in the Midwest for 28 years, so I don't know if I'm qualified to respond to this, but I am curious to know who these fish-averse people were or are.

What he said.
(Richard, you're not right, IMO, about Midwesterners and fish. You are right, though (IMO, again) about what constitutes seafood. So you're batting .500, which would be good if you were playing baseball. )

Maria Conlon
/Politics. It's all politics/.
It is a full moon tonight, I guess I'll post something to the NG. Simon reminds of persons who ride the transit buses for no other reaon that to have something to do.
These types annoy the drivers, annoy the other passengers, dress poorly, smell, and stare, and remark.
Some of these types are dumb and others aren't so dumb, but they make people nervous. Oh Lord, a Freck, what it must be like to have to live with one. Often the smarter ones are addicts, the dumber ones are mildly retarded mentally ill sorts.
Look at his picture, and you will see what I mean.

John Freck
PS. I will be back in 28.3 days.
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I only lived in the Midwest for 28 years, so I don't know if I'm qualified to respond to this, ... *is* consistent with the transportation issue, it is something of a stretch to broaden that to distaste for all fish.

True, but the core of seafood *is* ocean fish and shellfish. Of course many Midwesterners like to fish recreationally, and probably some of them eat the caught fish when laws and lack of concern about contaminants allow. I mean, I've read those Hemingway stories that are all about fishing. He was up in Michigan or some such.
I believe you've mentioned noticing a large body of water to the northeast of Chicago.

You mean The Lake? I think of this body of water, which I agree is large, as being to the east of Chicago rather than to the northeast, though granted it sort of stops right around where Chicago turns into those industrial hell-towns in northwest Indiana, and it continues to extend northward far beyond Chicago. BTW, now that it's spring (= ChiE "late winter") the Lake is turquoise in color again (rather than the color of snow and ice).
It happens that that lake contains numerous varieties of fish (and it used to contain a lot of others). Those who live anywhere near the Great Lakes (possibly excepting Lake Erie) would have access to vast amounts of fresh freshwater fish.

Sure, I've seen Chicagoans fishing (need preposition) the Lake. I've also seen New York people fishing (need preposition) the East River and the Harlem River. Tolkien's Gollum (fka Smeagol) might find such fish to be rather tasty, but I wouldn't risk eating it would you?

Now, maybe if you go way far north you get into parts where the fish is safe to eat, but actually I sort of doubt it, not on the western side of the Lake. Mr. or Ms. Pat Durkin is invited to comment, but it's my general impression that a fair amount of lake-coastal Wisconsin is one industrial pollution ground (NTTAWWT) after another. Maybe north of Milwaukee you'd be in bidness. Michigan might be a whole nother story.
Lampreys severely damaged the food-fish populations in the fifties and sixties, and zebra mussels do so today.

I think it's zebra mussels that (= TCE "that") are thought to be responsible, by some, for the turquoise color of the Chicago part of Lake Michigan, IIRC. Say what you want about Chicago, but that's a nize turquoise color that you just don't see beeack home.
Chicago gets its drinking water from Lake Michigan (apparently those monstrous structures you see on the horizon in the Lake are water filtration plants). I won't say that Chicago tap water is the worst I've ever tasted (that honor goes to South Dakota), but I think it's the most dangerous I've ever imbibed, causing all sorts of deathly ailments. I would guess that it's one step above European water. Incidentally, the best-tasting and healthiest tap water in America is to be found in the boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens, New York (Largest City in America).

You have to envy Brother Martin Ambuhl and Sister Sara Lorimer. The tap water of Manhattan is probably healthy, but it is unpleasant in taste (a chlorine thing, I think). Anyway, it's not like New York gets its tap water by desalinating the polluted waters of th'East River. But as for Chicago, if the treated water from the Lake is that harmful to the human drinker, why would one risk eating a fish that lived its brief and unfortunate life in the source of that tap water? I'm not even mentioning all the Cook County voters who live beneath those waters.
Whether those who live farther from large fresh fish supplies are averse to or simply unfamiliar with them as a ... but I've seldom run across people who dislike fish as a food category. So where do you find these folks?

Tootsie, you eat seafood?
Chicago gets its drinking water from Lake Michigan (apparently those monstrous structures you see on the horizon in the Lake ... it's one step above European water. Incidentally, the best-tasting and healthiest tap water in America is to be found in


If you haven't, as appears to be the case, had and loved grilled Lake Superior whitefish, then The Chicago Experience is truly wasted on you. You should go back to that jerkwater Eastern town you keep mentioning.
I used to get my whitefish fix at the Wrigley Building restaurant, and it was also a regular item at the Berghof. I've no idea where it's done properly today, if anywhere.
Lake Michigan water tastes great, too, by the way. It develops its unique bouquet as it passes through about a mile of rusty iron pipe from the intake stations to the treatment plant.

I've now mentioned the only two things about Chicago I miss.
Michael West
(Self-transported to Oz for the term of my natural life)
It is a full moon tonight, I guess I'll post something to the NG.

Wow it's a full moon here in Britain too! Coincidence, or what?

Matti
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Thus spake John Freck:
Oh Lord, a Freck, what it must be like to have to live with one.

I resent you calling me that.
Haven┬Ęt you got any boring lists to post?

Simon R. Hughes
I know I'm not the first person to make this ... 'thread drift' before, but this one surely takes the fish-cake?

It simply serves to prove that dead fish are more interesting than Simon's evilness or your lamentations about his evilness.

I was actually hinting (a little too subtly for you, it would seem) at the fact that it's time to change the subject header of this thread if people are going to go on talking about fish.
It's this very problem (with the way threads drift from their original subjects) that drives Bob Cunningham nuts and makes him choose abstract subject headers.

So, Tony, what has happened to this thread in fact "simply serves to prove" that Bob Cunningham has a very valid point.

Christopher
My e-mail address is not 'munged' in any way and is fully replyable!
On 5 Apr 2004 02:12:40 -0500, "Michael West"
I used to get my whitefish fix at the Wrigley Building restaurant, and it was also a regular item at the Berghof. I've no idea where it's done properly today, if anywhere.

The Men's Grill (now the men's and women's grill, and no better off for it) at the Berghoff was one of the best places for lunch in the Loop. The thuringer was wonderful.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Christopher Johnson wrote on 05 Apr 2004:
So, Tony, what has happened to this thread in fact "simply serves to prove" that Bob Cunningham has a very valid point.

While I agree with your point, CJ, I take exception to "a very valid point". "a valid point" is sufficient and better English.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
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