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Hi, these are sentences from another forum, which have created a lengthy debate. Some of them are difficult to determine if they are simple or complex clauses; that is, what types of clauses exist in these sentences.

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1.There was a welter of signs at the corner, each pointing in a different direction.

2. We watched Tim glut himself on pizza.

3. The butcher sold the entrails of the cow at a lower price than the other parts.

4. Seeing the barrow, the women knew they had found the grave of her grandfather.

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Please identify the independent clauses and dependent clauses that exist in these clauses.

Thanks in advance.
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Hi,
Different people have different definitions of what constitutes a clause. I consider 1, 2 and 3 to each consist of one clause. #4 has a main clause, followed by a subordinate clause.

However, I'm sure you have a more complex definition.

Best wishes, Clive
Comments  
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Thanks, Clive! I agree that everyone has different definitions of what constitutes a clause.

Here is how I see them:

1.There was a welter of signs at the corner, each pointing in a different direction.

Main clause, participle phrase

2. We watched Tim glut himself on pizza.

Main clause

3. The butcher sold the entrails of the cow at a lower price than the other parts.

Main clause subordinate clause (than the other parts were sold)

4. Seeing the barrow, the women knew they had found the grave of her grandfather.

Participle phrase , main clause subordinate clause (that they...)

Some people's answers were very strange, however. For example, one said that #2 had a dependent clause as well as a main clause. And also, one said #1 had a dependent clause!! (each pointing in different directions).

Cheers.
Hi,

I agree with you..

3. The butcher sold the entrails of the cow at a lower price than the other parts.

I agree with you, but I suppose one could also debate whether the latter phrase is really a clause. eg Perhaps one might also interpret it as The butcher sold the entrails of the cow at a lower price than the price of the other parts.

4. Seeing the barrow, the women knew they had found the grave of her (their?) grandfather.
A noun subordinate clause.

Clive
4. Seeing the barrow, the women knew they had found the grave of her (their?) grandfather.
A noun subordinate clause.

Yes, a noun/complement clause with the omitted complementizer (that). If you read the sentence aloud with 'that' included, it seems very strange; the omittion makes the sentence flow far better!

I'd appreciate your comments on this post if you wouldn't mind...

http://www.EnglishForward.com/English/SubordinatingConjunctionComma/hjgrl/post.htm

Cheers

Ed
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