I queued for over an hour at the counter but still could not get a ticket.

I did an exercise, and I thought this was a simple sentence since there is no comma before the "but", and there is only one subject. so far, for all the exercises I did, there should be a comma before "but". the answer for this question is compound sentence, as the pronoun "I" is ellipted.
can someone try to clear my confusion here?
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A simple sentence is one that contains a subject and a verb. A compound sentence is one that contains two simple sentences joined by a coordinating conjunction. The example could be split into simple sentences:

I queued for over an hour at the counter

and

(I) still could not get a ticket.

So, it is a compound sentence. As for the comma, there should be one in that sentence before but. Perhaps there was a typographical error in the original?
Hi, Rizzy,

Isn't it possible to consider it a simple sentence with a compound predicate?

I went to the kitchen and made a sandwich.
I went to the kitchen but found nothing to eat.

When would the comma not be needed?

Best wishes, - A.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
but the answer is compound sentence. without the comma, i thought it was a simple sentence. could it that the answer is wrong?
Over the last several days, I have been researching this question, and this is what I have discovered: there is contradictory information everywhere!

According to some people, a compound sentence has to have its subjects explicitly stated. If that's the case, all the examples cited are simple sentences because none of them has both clausal subjects explicitly stated. According to others, the subject does not need to be explicit.

My own instinct is that all the examples are compound sentences because they contain independent clauses which can be split with the deletion of the conjunction.

If anyone wants a clearer definition of simple/compound sentences, I can ask my linguistics lecturer at university.

As for the comma:

In general, when the independent clauses in a compound sentence are joined by a coordinating conjunction, they are separated by a comma.

The comma precedes the coordinating conjunction. A common
error
is to place the comma after the conjunction:

WRONG: We picked them up early but, they still missed their plane.

RIGHT: We picked them up early, but they still missed their plane.

WRONG: I hadn't seen my nieces and nephews for ages so, I went overboard on buying them Christmas gifts.

RIGHT: I hadn't seen my nieces and nephews for ages, so I went overboard on buying them Christmas gifts.

WRONG: Do you want to stay behind or, will you come with us?

RIGHT: Do you want to stay behind, or will you come with us?

Most of the time (treat it as about a 90-95% rule) you should use a comma between the independent clauses in a compound sentence. But occasionally it is permissible, and sometimes even preferable, to leave that comma out.

The current trend in American style is toward minimal punctuation. In other words, commas are seen as speedbumps, and we don't want unnecessary obstacles to slow down our readers. Many permissible commas can be left out of sentences where they once might have been required, or at least strongly preferred.

Under certain circumstances, the comma between independent clauses in a compound sentence can be left out, and sometimes even should be left out.

Here are the guidelines for deciding whether to omit the comma in a compound sentence.

1. If both independent clauses are quite short, especially if the two clauses are very closely related, and even more so if the subject of both clauses is the same.

~ He threw me the book and I dashed out the door.

~Linda washed the dishes and Naomi cleaned up the living room.

~I've been waiting for this letter but now I wish it hadn't come.

2. Even if only the first clause is quite short, especially if the two clauses are very closely related, and even more so if the subject of both clauses is the same.

~ Debby left home early but she wasn't able to make it to her class on time because the buses were running late.

~You have to write that paper tonight or you will almost certainly lose points for turning it in late.

(In each of these cases, you can use the comma if you prefer, but you also have the option of omitting it.)

NOTE: Never omit the comma if there is any chance that your sentence will be misread, even if only for a moment.

AMBIGUOUS: We finished eating dinner and then the children cleared the table.

IMPROVED: We finished eating dinner, and then the children cleared the table.

From: http://grammartips.homestead.com/compoundsentences.html
I have no problem with the comma analysis.
What continues to bother me is calling a simple sentence with a compound predicate: a compound sentence with the second subject elipsed, or elipted, or however one says it.
This seems like a slippery slope.
I went to the kitchen but found nothing to eat.
I went to the kitchen and made a sandwich.
I queued for over an hour at the counter but still could not get a ticket.

According to some people, a compound sentence has to have its subjects explicitly stated. If that's the case, all the examples cited are simple sentences because none of them has both clausal subjects explicitly stated. According to others, the subject does not need to be explicit.

I obviously belong to the first group. Emotion: smile - A.

I see no chance of settling the OP's dilema. The teacher says the blue example is a compound sentence with the second subject elipted. She doesn't seem to think a comma is needed.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
You're all missing the crucial point: only one lexical verb is permitted per clause. The verbs queued, and get are lexical verbs, so there must be two clauses in this sentence. It doesn't matter about the subject in the second clause being understood rather than explicit; that's a perfectly normal construction (it's called reduction by ellipsis). A comma before but is usual, but it has no relevance to whether the sentence is simple or compound. So, this a compound sentence of two coordinated clauses, joined by the coordinator but:

[I queued for over an an hour at the counter,] [but (I) still could not get a ticket].

BillJ
Ah yes, thank God for the rules, which keep us all straight. Your point is enticing.
But can you please give me an example of a compound predicate which doesn't have at least two lexical verbs?

By the way, do you chose "lexical verbs" in order to allow "non-finite verbs"?

Best wishes, - A. Emotion: smile

Hmmm, Wiki Answers gives, He ran and jumped and shouted and cried.
If we restore the elipted "he's," we'll have a quad sentence.
(We can let the comas slide.) Emotion: nodding
COMPOUND SENTENCE

A compound sentence is a sentence which has 2 or more independent clauses, and which has a complete meaning. A clause is a sentence that exists in a sentence. The word 'independent' in an independent clause means that semantically the clause does not depend on another clause and / or that such a clause can stand by itself. Then, an independent clause is a clause which does not depend on another clause, and / or which can stand by itself in the sense that the clause has a complete meaning without another clause. Independent clauses are composed of simple sentences. A simple sentence is a sentence which has one subject (S) and one predicate (P) or one object (O) if there is any, and which has a complete meaning. To be formed as independent clauses in a compound sentence, simple sentences are combined with (a) coordinate conjunction(s), (a) conjunctive adverb(s), (a) transition expression(s), or (a) semi colon(s).

Example:
* The manager is out.
* His secretary is absent.

Then, the above two sentences are combined as follows:

* The manager is out, and his secretary is absent.

Explanation:
'The manager (S) is out (P).' is a simple sentence, and 'His secretary (S) is absent (P).' is too, as you know each of the above two-sentences has one S and one P. After the above two-simple sentences have been combined with the coordinate conjunction 'and', they are independent clauses because each of them does not depend on each other and / or can stand by itself in the sense that it has a complete meaning without the other clause. Thus, 'The manager (S) is out (P) > independent clause, and (coordinate conjunction) his secretary (S) is absent (P) > independent clause.' is a compound sentence, a sentence which has 2 or more independent clauses, and which has a complete meaning.

*Note by comparing the above compound sentence with the following:

* He tested and debugged the program yesterday.

*Explanation:
'He (S) tested and debugged (P) the program (O) yesterday (adjunct).' is not a compound sentence, but it is a simple sentence because it has one S, one P with compound verb, and one O.

Compare the above, last simple sentence with the following:

* He (S) tested (P) the program (O) yesterday (adjunct). (simple sentence)
* He (S) debugged (P) it (O) yesterday (adjunct). (simple sentence)
* He (S) tested (P) the program (O) > independent clause, and (coordinate conjunction) he (S) debugged (P) it (O) yesterday (adjunct) > independent clause. (compound sentence)

My name is Tahajudin Sudibyo, and people call me Dibyo.

I live in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, and work as a staff member of Amikom College.
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