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Hi, I've got a sentence for which I would like to know the correct form. Check it out:

We always do/ are always doing our homework as soon as we are getting home/ get home.

My belief is that: "We always do our homework as soon as we get home." is correct.

My English teacher which is a German lady beleives that: "We always do our homework as soon as we are getting home." is correct. For me that doesn't make sence.

Maybe someone can help. Thanks.
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You are right. Find a new English teacher.
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Hi Blue;

Welcome to EnglishForward (EF for short.)

I'd be blue too if I had to suffer a teacher who does not know their subject.

Why don't you ask your teacher to check out her lessons, quizzes and exercises here on EF?
Most of us are native speakers, and we have quite a few ESL teachers, and even a few experts in linguistics.

There are British English speakers and American English speakers, so we can give information on the nuances of the different dialects.
If the questions are not too long, we respond very quickly.
Many times more than one person will answer, and sometimes we get into a friendly debate on the finer points of linguistics and language usage.

But we are always nice, polite and welcoming.

Regards,
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Comments  
Thanks for the Answer. I would like to find a new oneEmotion: smile but I'd have to leave or change school because she's my class teacher .Emotion: sad
 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
hello, do you know the difference between the participle clause and the participle phrase?
Anonymoushello, do you know the difference between the participle clause and the participle phrase?
Terminology.
Traditional grammar texts used the word "phrase" to mean a syntactic unit that did not contain a finite verb and subject.

Modern texts might use "reduced clause" for syntactic units that contain some form of a verb.
Here is an example:
http://web2.uvcs.uvic.ca/elc/studyzone/490/grammar/reduced-adjective-clauses-rules.htm