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1. The man drives the car every day.
2. The man drove the car yesterday.
3. The man is driving the car every day.
4. The man was driving the car yesterday.
What's the difference in meaning between 1, 2 and 3, 4 respectively?
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sitifan What's the difference in meaning between 1, 2 and 3, 4 respectively?
This doesn't compute.

Do you want to compare 1 with 2, and 3 with 4; or do you want to compare 1 with 3, and 2 with 4? (the latter, I suspect)

There's a way to say this using "respectively," but this isn't it.

Best wishes for a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

- A.
1. The man drives the car every day. He has this habit.

2. The man drove the car yesterday. Report of a past event.

3. The man is driving the car every day. This one is a bit anomalous without context. every day doesn't seem to fit very well. these days might be better.

4. The man was driving the car yesterday. Report of a past activity.

Sentences are often different because of the contexts they would be used in. It's hard to see the differences in isolated examples.

1. Tom does the same thing every day. He gets up. He gets ready for work. He reads the paper. He drives to work. ...

2. Yesterday, the following things happened at different points in time. Tom got up. Tom got ready for work. He drove to work. He arrived at work. ...

3a. These are the activities that Tom is doing at this moment. He is eating his breakfast. He is watching TV. He is reading this morning's newspaper.

3b. These are the activities that Tom is doing these days. He is enjoying his vacation. He is driving to the lake. He is fishing. He is catching lots of fish. He is getting a lot of sun.

4. Yesterday, Tom was doing these activities when something occurred. He was eating his breakfast. He was watching TV. (Suddenly he heard an explosion.)

CJ
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Generally speaking, a reduced relative represents only a progressive form.

1. The man who drives the car every day is my brother.
2. The man driving the car every day is my brother.
3. The man who drove the car yesterday was my brother.
4. The man driving the car yesterday was my brother.
Why do 1 and 3 have the same meanings as 2 and 4 respectively?

http://www.englishclub.com/esl-forums/viewtopic.php?f=199&t=51958
"Every day" and "yesterday" further qualify the time frames of the verb.
[1a]The boy who brings the milk every morning has been ill.
[2a]The boy bringing the milk every morning has been ill.
Does [2a] correspond to [1a]?
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sitifan[1a]The boy who brings the milk every morning has been ill.
[2a]The boy bringing the milk every morning has been ill.
Does [2a] correspond to [1a]?
No. "Who brings" focuses on the subject, "boy." "bringing the milk" focuses on the action.
The implication in (1) is that the usual boy has not been bringing the milk during his illness.
The implication in (2) is that he continues to bring the milk in spite of his illness, or that he has since recovered from any illness which might have prevented his delivering the milk.
Your point is well taken. You demonstrate why we sometimes must laugh at computerized translations. (You might be the man to solve this problem.)