I haven't thought about doing things in a group. Or I haven't thought that I should do something just because everyone around me does it.


Is it possible to replace 'or' above with 'and'?
1 2 3
I believe I would replace 'Or I haven't thought' with 'Nor have I thought' since the two statements involve two sides of one idea, that is, an individual acting in relation to a group. It could also be worked into a single sentence:

I have neither thought about doing things in a group, nor doing something just because everyone around me does it.
i) I have NEITHER thought about doing things in a group NOR have I thought OF doING something just because everyone around me does it.

ii) I haven't thought about doing things in a group AND NEITHER have I thought OF doING something just because everyone around me does it.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Thank you, people. But I know the usage of 'neither' and 'nor'.

I'm just wondering if the single 'and' can be used to connect the sentences that I posted.
Temico,
Thank you for the correction in my offering.

Taka,
When you make the choice between 'or' and 'and', it seems like you want a better conceptual connection between the two statements.

'Or' sounds like the writer is changing her mind about what she is trying say; 'and' sounds like the writer is making a list. I think the relation between the two thoughts deserves the 'neither/nor'.
'Or' sounds like the writer is changing her mind about what she is trying say


Not necessarily, in my opinion. Consider:
She studies botany, or the science of plants.

----------
'and' sounds like the writer is making a list.

Right. That's why I'm wondering if 'and' is possible or not. I mean, from a certain point of view, it does seem to be some kind of list, doesn't it? He/she seems to be making some sort of list of the thoughts he/she has never had.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
And I'll leap in here with the simplistic comment that 'and' is better there, all else unconsidered:

'I haven't done this; and I haven't done that'-- rather than (X) 'I haven't done this; or I haven't done that'.
Good, MM!

So, if they are both independent, even the negatives can be connected by 'and'.

Correct?
By independent, are you speaking grammatically? These are equally independent:

I haven't done this. I haven't done that. -- for having done neither of them.
I haven't done this; I haven't done that. -- for having done neither of them.
I haven't done this and I haven't done that.-- for having done neither of them.
(BUT: I haven't done this or I haven't done that.-- for not having done only one of them.)

Grammatically, they are all independent clauses, though the semantics of interconnectivity may vary slightly. But the two negatives still rightfully take the 'and' conjunction, as opposed to:

I have done this. I have done that. -- for having done both of them.
I have done this; I have done that. -- for having done both of them
I have done this and I have done that. -- for having done both of them.
(BUT: I have done this or I have done that.-- for having done only one of them.)

Is that what you are driving at, Taka?-- that was my point.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Show more