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Can anyone please clear my doubts.

If i'd like to ask a friend how many years he has been living in a country, can i say, " How

many years it has been since you live in Sweden?" OR " How many years you have been

living in Sweden?," OR "How many years you have lived in Sweden already?,".

In my own way of saying in an informal conversation, i'd say "How many

years already you have been living in Sweden?" I'm not sure if it sounds natural to native

speakers?

Another question, if i say " I don't know we would be such a good friend

at/in/from beginning?" Which one is a more appropriate preposition to use in this context.

Many thanks.
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Comments  (Page 6) 
Get along cowboy Lai!
To Temico,

I'd say it's rather a matter of modesty.
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To pieanne,
I have heard of "peeping Tom" but never heard of "peeping Mary". Have you??
Do you know the origin of "Peeping Tom", temico?
Nope, Abbie. Perhaps you would be kind enough to enlighten me.

BTW, is it true that the British are suffering from a sense of humour failure?

http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20050524/lf_afp/afplifestylebritain_050524214117

I had been told that the British were more adapt to GRUMBLING and not to WORRYING. I guess "worrying" has now caught up with them too!
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Here is the story of lady Godiva

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godiva

Wikipedia says that Tom was "struck blind", though we believe he had his eyes put out by Leofric, Earl of Mercia
I wonder if Tom was peeping at the horse or Lady Godiva?Emotion: stick out tongue
lol

Temico,

I wouldn't worry too much. The British can afford to have their humour slashed to about 5% of its current level, and STILL have the best grope ... oops, GROUP sense of humour in the galaxy!

I'm sure you noticed that that study compared their current gaffaw factor to the gaffaw factor (from some unspecified 'research') 30 years ago. A good deal of research of this nature carried out 30 years ago also involved LSD and 'whako tobacco', both of which are known to ... um ... what was I laughing at?

(That's strange. Would have sworn there was a link to some Pom tickling article here a moment ago. Oh well, back to the lab.)
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Mike,

......both of which are known to ... um ... find their own way into one's pocket....just like "estacy" today.....Emotion: big smile
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