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Hello:

Using "Since a long time ago"
was considered incorrect some years ago, as far as I know. Is it now acceptable?
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Comments  
I wouldn't say it was. 'Since' refers to a point in time. 'For', on the other hand, refers to a period of time and doesn't have to be as well-defined: 'for ages', 'for a long time' 'forever', etc.
I doubt that many native speakers accept "since a long time ago" in place of "for a long time", even though it is perfectly understandable.

I haven't seen them [*since a long time ago / for a long time].

CJ
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a long time ago is an adverbial phrase and since is a preposition.

Therefore, a phrase made of a preposition followed by an adverbial phrase was not and is not acceptible.

pine

To some extent you are right, however, "for a long time" contradicts the rule you are using since "for a long time" is an adverbial phrase introduced by the preposition "for"

I know it has little to do with the main tread.

Jay
Pinenuta long time ago is an adverbial phrase and since is a preposition.

Therefore, a phrase made of a preposition followed by an adverbial phrase was not and is not acceptible.

pine

An adverbial phrase can be a prepostional phrase eg, 'He did it on time'.

Btw, it's acceptable Emotion: smile
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Jussive
Pinenuta long time ago is an adverbial phrase and since is a preposition.

Therefore, a phrase made of a preposition followed by an adverbial phrase was not and is not acceptible.

pine

An adverbial phrase can be a prepostional phrase eg, 'He did it on time'.

Btw, it's acceptable Emotion: smile

Obviously, you did not understand what I said.

I said you could not use an advervial phrase such as on tim after another preposition.
For example, you can't say, " since on time, after on time, for on time, and since a long time ago"

Do you see the difference? I hop you will.

pine
Take the bins out tomorrow.

Take the bins out for tomorrow.
JussiveTake the bins out tomorrow.

Take the bins out for tomorrow.

You obviously need to read you grammar book again.

Take the bins out for tomorrow.

In your example, out is the particle of the verb, take. and is not a preposition. In other words, out is part of the verb.
I don't think you will understand this term. That is why I said you needed to study grammar again.

particle = an adverb or preposition that can combine with a verb to form a phrasal verb [from Longman Dictionary]

pine

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