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According to one usage guide, since and ago cannot be used together. Never say since two/three/four months/years ago. According to another grammar book, since a minute ago is correct. I am confused. Can anyone explain this usage?
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TeoAccording to one usage guide, since and ago cannot be used together. Never say since two/three/four months/years ago. According to another grammar book, since a minute ago is correct. I am confused. Can anyone explain this usage?
Normally, "ago" refers to a completed time - it's in the past. Since, on the other hand, refers to a time when something began and continued up to another point.

I came here a year ago. (completed time/action)

I've been here since 3pm. (incomplete time action)

If you combine the two, it doesn't work.

Also, "since" is used with
Well, "since a minute ago" means "for one minute", like in "I've only been home for one minute" = "I got/came home only one minute ago". So you can use either according to what you want to express (the length of time you've been home/the moment you came home). But I'm sure it is used. The question is: is it grammatical? and there you'll need a native Emotion: smile
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Hi,

According to one usage guide, since and ago cannot be used together. Never say since two/three/four months/years ago. According to another grammar book, since a minute ago is correct. I am confused. Can anyone explain this usage?

This is a topic that is often debated. People seem to have very strong opinions that it is wrong, wrong, wrong or right, right, right.

I'm in the 'right' group. 'A year ago' identifies a point in the past, in the same way that I might say 'February 2005'.

I've known him since a year ago.

I've known him since February, 2005.

I've known him for a year is also commonly used in such a case.

I have no doubt that some other people will offer you the opposite opinion.

Best wishes, Clive
PieanneWell, "since a minute ago" means "for one minute", like in "I've only been home for one minute" = "I got/came home only one minute ago". So you can use either according to what you want to express (the length of time you've been home/the moment you came home). But I'm sure it is used. The question is: is it grammatical? and there you'll need a native Emotion: smile

This native says "no!".
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TeoAccording to one usage guide, since and ago cannot be used together. Never say since two/three/four months/years ago. According to another grammar book, since a minute ago is correct.
The first is correct.

http://www.eslcafe.com/forums/student/viewtopic.php?p=56180#56180
Well now there is a dispute with a textbook company over this:

AGO AND SINCE can ONLY be combined like so:

INCORRECT: He has been in New York since three days ago.

CORRECT: He has been in New York since he came three days ago.
1. He has lived in Taipei for three years. -- correct
2. He has lived in Taipei since three years ago. -- incorrect
3. He has lived in Taipei since he arrived there three years ago. -- correct
[In this sentence, "since" is used to modify the clause "since he arrived
there," not the phrase "three years ago."]
4. Since its original publication almost 20 years ago, the Synonym Finder has
met with huge success among students, authors, speechwriters, and others in
search of le mot juste. -- correct
[In this sentence, "since" is used to modify "its original publication,"
not "almost 20 years ago."]
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