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Can you please explain when to use non-count nouns in their plural forms. For example:

profit vs profits

feeling vs feelings

communication vs communications

difficulty vs difficulties

skill vs skills

My difficulty is that I can't seemd to understand the concept or when to add an "s" to something that I can't count, e.g., I can't count how many profit(s), or how many feeling(s), etc. I can count one apple or two apples. Can you please explain. Thank you very much.

Sunshine in DC.
Comments  
When a non-count noun takes a plural form, it becomes a countable noun. You have to decide whether you are speaking of the non-countable condition/quality/amount, or of multiple instances of the same. For example, I can have many feelings during a baseball game-- elation, depression, hope, despair,etc.-- or I can decide that feeling is inappropriate for a spectator sport and I can go place a bet with my bookie.

Does this help?
kindly give the singular of the following sentence; These trousers are expensive.
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"These shorts are expensive"?

MrP
This pair of shorts is expensive?
Anonymouskindly give the singular of the following sentence; These trousers are expensive.
There is no singular. This trouser is expensive is not Standard English.
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No, indeed. The singular is a pair of ...