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Hi,

I've got a question. I know that you should generally use the singular form of a verb with collective nouns (e.g. My team is here. The herd is moving south.), but a few things confuse me with two specific nouns - police and family. I always see plurals with police. Why is that? Is it just an exception to the rule? And a few days ago I saw a sentence in my textbook saying 'Mark asked Jenny if all of her family were still in town.'. Now, I would have understood it if 'family' was followed by 'members', that's logical, but I don't understand the particular example. Could you please help here?

Marina
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Comments  (Page 2) 

Do you say a committee of students and teachers choose or chooses a play?

My answer is: A committee of students and teachers choose a play.

I chose this option because "and" is between the two nouns.

Although committee is collective teachers and students would indicate who the members of the committee are.

Looking forward yo your feedback


Anonymous

anonymousI chose this option because "and" is between the two nouns.

You would have been correct had not the sentence begun with “A committee”, which is clearly the body which does the choosing (and is therefore the actual subject of the sentence). The phrase which follows: “of students and teachers”, is merely explanatory of the composition of the committee.

My answer is: A committee of students and teachers chooses a play.

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.