Sentences like "Everybody is required to show THEIR ID when THEY cross the gate." or "Anyone who calls will have THEIR number registered." are grammatically absurd. How can we begin a sentence with a singular subject and verb and end up with plurals?
I think we should make up a new pronoun and possessive adjective that would resolve that issue. Why don't we simply pick up the neutral IT?

"Everybody is required to show its ID when it crosses the gate." "Anyone who calls will have its number registered."

No more he/she, his/her, no more singular they. A singular leads to a singular.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Sentences like "Everybody is required to show THEIR ID when THEY cross the gate." or "Anyone who calls will have ... calls will have its number registered." No more he/she, his/her, no more singular they. A singular leads to a singular.

This is the single most common "point" raised in aue and aeu. I will say no more than:
http://alt-usage-english.org/excerpts/fxgender.html http://tinyurl.com/vw33

David
==
Sentences like "Everybody is required to show THEIR ID when THEY cross the gate." or "Anyone who calls will have THEIR number registered." are grammatically absurd. How can we begin a sentence with a singular subject and verb and end up with plurals?

They are no more absurd than the use of "you" for both the singular and the plural. It has been an integral part of the English language for over 700 years, with its origin going back another 300 at least, and causes problems for nobody but the ignorant and over-pedantic.
I think we should make up a new pronoun and possessive adjective that would resolve that issue. Why don't we simply pick up the neutral IT?

Please stop thinking. There is no issue to resolve.
"Everybody is required to show its ID when it crosses the gate." "Anyone who calls will have its number registered." No more he/she, his/her, no more singular they. A singular leads to a singular.

Yeuch!!

Dave OSOS#24 (Email Removed) Remove my gerbil for email replies

Yamaha XJ900S & Wessex sidecar, the sexy one
Yamaha XJ900F & Watsonian Monaco, the comfortable one

http://dswindell.members.beeb.net
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
On 11/20/03 1:36 PM, in article
Sentences like "Everybody is required to show THEIR ID when THEY cross the gate." or "Anyone who calls will have ... "Everybody is required to show its ID when it crosses the gate." "Anyone who calls will have its number registered."

That would be every bit as "absurd" as using singular "they". How can we begin a sentence with an animate subject and end up referring to it with an inanimate pronoun?
No more he/she, his/her, no more singular they. A singular leads to a singular.

But an animate leads to an inanimate. Every bit as absurd. The only difference is that you probably didn't learn about the difference between animate and inanimate pronouns in grammar school.
Sentences like "Everybody is required to show THEIR ID when ... the gate." "Anyone who calls will have its number registered."

This would be a great help to all those not clever enough to reword appropriately, e.g.
Identity documents must be shown.
The number of each caller will be registered.

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs (Ottawa, Canada)
I think we should make up a new pronoun and possessive adjective that would resolve that issue. . . .

I think we should avoid trolls.

Cordially,
Eric Walker
My opinions on English are available at
http://owlcroft.com/english /
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
That's the ignorant neopossessive "its". The proper third person inanimate genitive is "his".
This would be a great help to all those not clever enough to reword appropriately, e.g. Identity documents must be shown. The number of each caller will be registered.

Those are passive, which is just as bad as singular they.

Anyone who calls is required to show that his or her or their identity documents are registered with the number of the beast.
Those are passive, which is just as bad as singular they.

The thing about the whole mess that baffles me most is that despite just about everybody's recognizing a serious defect in the language that one eentsy-weentsy little term, almost certainly one syllable, would resolve happily, no one has ever been able to conjure any such term that could gain the least shred of popular support. We are left with the seriously crippled and highly inflammatory singular "they": why, one must wonder, the invariable resistance to some devised term? Far worse terms than any yet suggested for a neutral personal singular pronoun have been happily adopted to meet needs far less obvious.

Cordially,
Eric Walker
My opinions on English are available at
http://owlcroft.com/english /
Sentences like "Everybody is required to show THEIR ID when THEY cross the gate." or "Anyone who calls will have THEIR number registered." are grammatically absurd. How can we begin a sentence with a singular subject and verb and end up with plurals?

Troll?

Marc Lombart 20/11/2003 21:01:30 http://www.marcmywords.com

Back in the day when printed material required each letter on the sheet to be carefully laid out in a print box, the letters "p" and "q" were sometimes mistaken for one another, and that's where the phrase "mind your 'p's and 'q's" comes from.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Show more