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You can sit aboard in a cozy restaurant and look out at an endless sea of ice. Then feel the ship shudder as it moves through the water, crushing/breaking the ice in its path.

To begin with, is aboard dispensable in the above? If not, what does it signify here?

Second, are crushing and breaking always interchangeable? Thanks.
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This is a brochure selling a cruise. You need "aboard" to underline that the restaurant in on the ship.

By the same token, although you can say either crush or break, "crushing" is much more evocative.
Feebs11This is a brochure selling a cruise. You need "aboard" to underline that the restaurant in on the ship.

By the same token, although you can say either crush or break, "crushing" is much more evocative.
Thanks, Feebs.

Got it.

By the way, I find the way you write very refined and descriptive, and maybe I'd like to use your wording sometime. But I have to make sure of the meanings of the bolded parts in your post. I guess they refer to Likewise/Similarly and expressive/vivid/descriptive respectively, right?
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Gee, thanks Emotion: embarrassed

Yes, broadly you are right. Evocative means evoking strong images, memories, or feelings.
Feebs11Gee, thanks Emotion: embarrassed

Yes, broadly you are right. Evocative means evoking strong images, memories, or feelings.
Thanks, Feebs.

Just to make sure, based on your reply, I presume evocative is much stronger than vivid/descriptive/pictureque, right?
Stronger, but not necessarily much stronger. It's a useful word!
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Feebs11Stronger, but not necessarily much stronger. It's a useful word!
Thanks, Feebs.

I like the way you use the word "evocative." Your writing is very evocative.